Back to: Back home (latest instance) | Forward to: Truth in advertising

Dear internet ...

Does anyone know if this (T-Mobile UKs HSDPA laptop 3G data card) is compatible with laptops running Linux, kernel 2.6.17 (distro: Kubuntu 6.10)?

I've seen discussions that imply that T-Mobile re-brand Option's cards, and I've found this source of information on configuring Option GlobeTrotter cards under Linux, but I've got nowhere trying to find out what particular model T-Mobile are currently hawking to Web'N'Walk customers. So if any existing T-Mobile UK Web'N'Walk customers with a data card can let me know what model number they've got (via the comments link below) I'd be very grateful.

NB: this is not an open invitation for Americans to tell me what Cingular card to use, Brits to tell me to switch to Vodafone, Windows bigots to go "har har" at the Linux user, Mac users to say "get a mac", GNOME evangelists to encourage me to switch away from KDE, Fedora freaks to urge me to ditch Ubuntu, or anything else like that. It's just an inquiry about one particular data card on one particular network and one particular operating system.

16 Comments

1:

Hi Charlie,

Pleasure to say hello to you at PicoCon this past weekend - I was the chap asked the question that involved Children of Men and Battlestar Galactica at your panel discussion.

On to the question:
http://www.trustedreviews.com/mobile-devices/review/2006/06/30/T-Mobile-Web-n-Walk-Card/p1

That review says that T-Mobile have 'gone with Option technology', while this PDF:
http://umtsmon.sourceforge.net/docs/NLUUG20060914.umts.paper.pdf
seems to have a whole heap of information about different 3G/HSDPA cards and their use with Linux on a laptop.

Hope that helps!

Dave

2:

To answer myself: umtsmon seems to be a handy widget. (Shame it's not part of Ubuntu yet.)

3:

I think Sierra Wireless's cards should do it, but that is probably off topic.

4:

Never, ever use Sierra Worthless cards; I speak from bitter experience (2 years software testing of mobile datacommunication software) as even under Windows they are more borken than not.

The picture you shows does look like the Option HSDPA card I've had in test.

5:
NB: this is not an open invitation for ... Windows bigots to go "har har" at the Linux user

Well, if they do you can always say "har har" back.

The data card doesn't work with Vista.

7:

Raynar: I got to the next base on from there in HALTING STATE. Just hope it comes out before real life catches up ...

8:

Charlie: "NB: this is not an open invitation for Americans to tell me what Cingular card to use, Brits to tell me to switch to Vodafone, Windows bigots to go "har har" at the Linux user, Mac users to say "get a mac", GNOME evangelists to encourage me to switch away from KDE, Fedora freaks to urge me to ditch Ubuntu, or anything else like that. It's just an inquiry about one particular data card on one particular network and one particular operating system."

7 comments and nobody's flouted those instructions. What do we have here - cringing serfs or proud interbubenetizens?

9:

its simple - noone has anything sensible to say about connecting obscure radio card to obscure operating system

what a huge leap of faith it is to assume that its even possible

10:

Damien: it appears that it is possible, for some models by the same manufacturer. So shut the fuck up and get with the program. OK?

11:

I know a similar card Just Works under FreeBSD, so I'd take it as "very possible." The big question will be was the correct module compiled on your box, and will you have to hand install it, or will it automatically work. Most of them hook in via the WiFi drivers (well, it is a wireless network adapter) but some hook in as a very fast modem running PPP (which, arguably, it is as well.)

However, without knowing what it'll want without plugging it in, I'm afraid I can't offer you specifics offhand. I'll try to do some research tonight.

The normal way I'd handle this is to try and borrow one and see what the kernel says when I plug it in, but that is often impossible with cell gear. Can you get an exact model number?

12:

Oops. Reading *all* the words (I'm very tired) I can see that you can't get the model number. Sorry about that.

13:

comments and nobody's flouted those instructions. What do we have here - cringing serfs or proud interbubenetizens?

Well, there's the point that we're all essentially guests in Charlie's living room here. Y'know, common courtesy, all that stuff.

Then too, Charlie does scathing pretty well; so do I, which is why I mostly try not to. I'd prefer not to pick a flame war with him unless we're both clear that it's all good clean fun. You can rack that one up in the "cringing serf" or "common courtesy" column, as suits you.

14:

Charlie -- the best way to find out for sure would be to borrow/steal one of the cards temporarily, stick it in your laptop, and look at lsusb and lspci. If you post that then I can make a pretty educated guess about how well it will work...

(posted from a laptop running Ubuntu 7.04 ;)

15:

Clifton, it was a joke.

16:

I know this is a somewhat tardy response, but just in case you were still wondering, I got a T-Mobile card in mid-March and it's an Option Globetrotter Fusion+, (NF******), and works nicely for most purposes but looks like T-Mobile are preventing NNTP traffic in case you wanted to look at Usenet any time.

I'm not using Linux but looks like it should be fine.

Specials

Merchandise

About this Entry

This page contains a single entry by Charlie Stross published on February 20, 2007 5:54 PM.

Back home (latest instance) was the previous entry in this blog.

Truth in advertising is the next entry in this blog.

Find recent content on the main index or look in the archives to find all content.

Search this blog

Propaganda