Nojay

Nojay

  • Commented on The Labyrinth Index: sneak preview!
    Doubling the range more than quadruples the error at point of impact for several reasons -- variability of wind and atmosphere conditions en route, the loss of velocity due to the extra distance travelled more than doubles the flight time...
  • Commented on The Labyrinth Index: sneak preview!
    What the article about the longest sniper shot didn't mention was the twenty or thirty attempts to get a bullet on target before the last one actually hit something. "Spray and pray", see. Effective range for a modern sniper rifle,...
  • Commented on Do my Homework
    The quad-110Ah battery pack I suggested is a low-cost starter kit, something that can be added to as requirements change or money becomes available whereas the Tesla Powerwall unit is a big lump of cash up front and maybe overkill...
  • Commented on Do my Homework
    The case is were the "inventory control label" was attached. They were fragile, silver labels that were counted during inventory every six months. They could not be pealed off, and put on a new printer, without damage. Bets? We had...
  • Commented on Do my Homework
    As a self-certified geek you could build a solar-charged battery pack yourself. $1500 US will get you four 110Ah 12V "maritime" lead-acid batteries for a 5kWh supply (although, like Li-ion they don't like being really deep-discharged so realistically 3kWh is...
  • Commented on Do my Homework
    Oh dear, another Biggest Battery Breakthrough Since Breakfast announcement. In Nature, of all things, not an engineering supply catalogue or production report. I see BBBSB reports and announcements all the time. I tend to poo-poo them since the rarely if...
  • Commented on Do my Homework
    I don't know that "millions of geeks" actually want an energy storage pack as big as a typical EV or even hybrid vehicle requires. For one thing where are they going to store it? Not indoors if they want their...
  • Commented on Do my Homework
    There's a thing with introduction of a new technology where the initial offerings are not much better than the established alternatives but it's obvious that the ramp up of the new tech will eventually outshine the existing well-developed competition. There's...
  • Commented on Do my Homework
    I've mentioned it before but EVs have a floor price for second-hand and pass-down models based on the value of the battery pack. If the battery is any good, and it has to be decent to provide useful range between...
  • Commented on "I doubt me an it be commercial."
    the cutting angle being the only difference between certain sizes of some imperial parts. Whitworth and BSF are 55 degree threads but everything else for steel fasteners after that, US, British and European metric are 60 degree and yes, you...
  • Commented on "I doubt me an it be commercial."
    Ratchet handles and socket sets are universally square Imperial, 1/4" up through 1" and beyond. The home workshop tops out at 3/4" drive usually, most folks stop at 1/2". The 1/4" hex socket is not uncommon for things like screw...
  • Commented on "I doubt me an it be commercial."
    How may here have pressed the threads of a bolt into their finger tip and used that to compare to other bolts? Not accurate enough for my purposes. I have on occasion put threaded fasteners on a high-definition flatbed scanner...
  • Commented on "I doubt me an it be commercial."
    I suspect it was a case of someone who really knew exactly what they were doing, just based on how easy it was to service and how reliable it was. Mostly it's Not Invented Here syndrome plus a lot of...
  • Commented on "I doubt me an it be commercial."
    clearly stamped with "Whitworth fine 5/16 RH" and LH, or something similar, kept in an old cigar box with big writing on the front "SUMP PUMP IMPELLER TAPS. NOT WHITWORTH DO NOT USE". They were probably BSF (British Standard Fine),...
  • Commented on Do my Homework
    I can't remember the exact details but Terry Pratchett's "Dark Side of the Sun" posited the first intelligent (indeed super-intelligent) lifeforms came into existence a few milliseconds after the Big Bang and it was an endless succession of intelligence in...
  • Commented on Do my Homework
    the first man on the moon (it's always a man in those stories, although nobody in the 1950s thought to call the hero of a two-fisted space engineering story "Armstrong"), Ahem? The first line of "Rocket Jockey" by Lester...
  • Commented on "I doubt me an it be commercial."
    Whitworth has a 55-degree thread, meant to work in cast and wrought iron. All modern steel fasteners work with a 60-degree angle including metric and American Unified Thread types (what used to be called SAE in the old days), even...
  • Commented on Media Piracy and Unpronounceable Names
    I certainly handled such plastic coins in the early 1960s, going to the shop to buy groceries as well as getting them from my parents or even finding them in the street. The coinage probably grew out of the "milk...
  • Commented on Media Piracy and Unpronounceable Names
    Time was the Co-op (Co-operative Society, a chain of customer-owned grocery shops and other businesses like funeral parlours) had their own currency. I used to get some of it as a kid, the "divi" or dividend on purchases, an early...
  • Commented on Media Piracy and Unpronounceable Names
    The intended point is to discuss how you keep from having a single universal ledger powerful actors can use for meta- sorts of purposes You'd be surprised (or maybe you wouldn't) how effectively supposedly-anonymised data can be de-anonymised. I don't...
  • Commented on Dread of Heinleinism
    I know that cartographers would sometimes introduce odd errors like non-existent streets to "watermark" their maps -- the London A to Z has a couple of such deliberate errata, now well-known. The GI Joe toy had/has a deliberately defective thumbnail...
  • Commented on Dread of Heinleinism
    Manual checking of log tables is itself prone to error, transcription from written lists of calculated logs and trig functions to typesetting requires another galley proof pass or three and it was common for such books of tables to go...
  • Commented on Dread of Heinleinism
    given an understanding of logarithms or square roots, anyone with time and nothing better to do can work out the numeric values. Doing it accurately without computers is the problem -- Charles Babbage among others spent an inordinate amount of...
  • Commented on Dread of Heinleinism
    John Michael Greer at one point flagged slide rules as an important post-apocalyptic tool, An accurate computer-generated set of log, trig and root tables would be more useful. They could be engraved on enduring stone in various places for post-apocalyptic...
  • Commented on Taxonomy of story, or, why murder?
    There's been a series of engineering works at various railway stations here in the UK to lengthen the platforms to accommodate longer trains to handle more passengers. The results are more passengers and overcrowding at peak periods and delays and...
  • Commented on Taxonomy of story, or, why murder?
    Manually cleaning each solar panel is a lot more work and more expensive than spraying water pumped up from a local aquifer (the usual solution). Shame that the aquifer is getting depleted and not refilled because, you know, it's a...
  • Commented on Dread of Heinleinism
    In the 1920s and 1930s the Russians were also trying to insert agents into the U.S. Well it's not like the U.S. weren't installing their own agents in the Soviet Union around this time... https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/American_Expeditionary_Force,_Siberia...
  • Commented on "I doubt me an it be commercial."
    The Davy Crockett nuclear device was never an atomic "hand grenade" and there never was a realistic intention to develop one -- for one thing the minimum critical mass for a uranium or plutonium weapons is about 5kg and practically...
  • Commented on Taxonomy of story, or, why murder?
    Dalry Road is a four-lane road although it's usually got cars and vans parked both sides along most of its length turning it into a two-lane road in reality. The 7-metre-wide road I mentioned is Haymarket Yards which has the...
  • Commented on Taxonomy of story, or, why murder?
    Measuring on Google Earth, most railways around this neck of the woods in Edinburgh are electrified and two railbeds plus overhead catenary towers are about 11 to 12 metres wide. A public 2-lane road near me which passes between two...
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