Nojay

Nojay

  • Commented on Sitrep
    The milspec wheelbarrow I mentioned (and I wish I could find the reference material I saw about it) actually had three wheels -- there was a central smaller fat-tire wheel that was positioned about two-thirds along the body under the...
  • Commented on Sitrep
    The wheelbarrow thing could be pulled uphill by two or more squaddies, on level-ish ground it could be propelled by one while changing over on a regular basis to reduce fatigue. Its top was basically a flatbed stretcher which could...
  • Commented on Sitrep
    Re: Boston Dynamics robots Beg to differ - with a silent/quiet power source, they are an awesome solution to the problem of “how can dismounted infantry carry everything they need?”. Well, there's nuclear power which is mostly quiet and removes...
  • Commented on That sinking feeling
    A lot of the pharma industry advertising dollars go into prime-time teevee promotions about miracle drug X and how the suffering viewer should speak to their doctor about it. This is expensive but productive in terms of sales, not so...
  • Commented on That sinking feeling
    Strange attractor time... The French shut down and reduce output on a few of their reactors during the summer since they've got overcapacity at that point in time and they can't sell more than a few GW of that overcapacity...
  • Commented on That sinking feeling
    One problem with Ekranoplans is they move too fast too close to the water surface to use them easily in busy traffic areas like harbours and around inhabited coastlines. This limits their civilian use more than most folks might realise....
  • Commented on That sinking feeling
    The air-tower generator was called, IIRC, the Otter. It used a lot of concrete, designed to last ten years in the mid-Atlantic. It broke up after six months in the more sheltered waters among the islands. The Limpet worked better,...
  • Commented on Canned Monkeys Don't Ship Well, the Remix Version
    There's a fascinating bit in the book where a Data General engineer walks the Tracy Kidder through a single clock cycle on the new wizzy Eagle 32-bit superminicomputer. He is astounded that so much happens in such a short time...
  • Commented on Canned Monkeys Don't Ship Well, the Remix Version
    A whole extra 32 bit processor complete with storage and OS inside a bigger CPU, for example. In Tracy Kidder's "The Soul of a New Machine" about the development of Data General's new 32-bit Eagle minicomputer, one feature involved integrating...
  • Commented on Canned Monkeys Don't Ship Well, the Remix Version
    The problem with being exposed to 0.29Sv of ionising radiation over a thousand years of hibernation sleep is that there are no biological repair mechanisms at work while the tissues are frozen and dormant. Basically all the cellular damage is...
  • Commented on That sinking feeling
    Whisky (we don't make that stuff with an 'e' in it) is a pipeline good several years long, by law. We've got hundreds of thousands of barrels of the stuff maturing away with the raw whisky going into bond today...
  • Commented on Canned Monkeys Don't Ship Well, the Remix Version
    because women can do anything a man can do, and one essential thing men can't. Is the uterine replicator magictech and if so, why? We know they exist as bioengineering already inside squishy meatsacks, what about them is impossible...
  • Commented on Canned Monkeys Don't Ship Well, the Remix Version
    You'd spend decades and billions training a workforce to produce the most advanced computing equipment known to humanity, along with global supply chains and huge manufacturing infrastructure. Then, when the market was saturated with these devices, you'd let the entire...
  • Commented on The Pivot
    China is planning to build a lot of new coal-fired power stations, so-call super-critical and ultra-critical plants which are coal-burners for the 21st century. They operate at much higher temperatures than regular coal-fired furnaces and are more efficient. They also...
  • Commented on The Pivot
    Any easily transportable fuel is fungible, it doesn't really matter where it comes from as long as the cost of transporting it from producer to consumer it is kept low. Pipeline fuels like oil and gas are very fungible and...
  • Commented on Unsustainable Interstellar Civilization, Hotspot Colonies, and Dwarf Culture
    A lot of the restrictions on development depended on materials and engineering capabilities. It's possible to build a simple atmospheric steam engine using wood for a lot of the pressure components such as cylinders and pistons but you can't really...
  • Commented on Unsustainable Interstellar Civilization, Hotspot Colonies, and Dwarf Culture
    Stirling engines are good at getting very small amounts of mechanical motion out of small temperature differentials but with horrendous efficiency in terms of joules in versus joules out. If super-efficient Stirling engines able to act as prime movers could...
  • Commented on Unsustainable Interstellar Civilization, Hotspot Colonies, and Dwarf Culture
    ISTR reading somewhere on this very blog that NiFe battery technology is dependent on the purity levels of the metals involved and that small amounts of contaminants in the anode or cathode structures can kill a cell quite quickly. Producing...
  • Commented on Unsustainable Interstellar Civilization, Hotspot Colonies, and Dwarf Culture
    John M. Ford's "How Much For Just The Planet" had the Worst Ship in the Federation Fleet, The USS Jefferson Randolph Smith (NCC-29407), a small cowardly ship that at one point tries to hide from the Klingons in the Enterprise's...
  • Commented on The Pivot
    Edinburgh Fire Service has a curtainsider trailer with attached forklift that's used to support major incidents including pile-ups on the motorways. I've seen it driving around the city on occasion. The tractor unit isn't necessarily a dedicated Fire Service vehicle...
  • Commented on The Pivot
    Early coal-mining was carried out in the best, most accessible coal seams and half a ton of production per person of coal per shift was quite normal using railcarts for underground haulage and draft animals to power windlasses etc. That...
  • Commented on The Pivot
    Coppicing is an AI-hard task and not prone to labour-saving automation. It can be done by serfs or slaves but it needs a human at the controls to do it and the yield per man-hour, woman-hour or child-hour is low....
  • Commented on The Pivot
    I mentioned turboprops being considered as possible CAS airframes because no-one is building modern piston-engined combat-capable aircraft with, say, the performance of a P-51D (440 mph) or later DH Mosquito variant (410 mph). Propellor tip speed is not a problem...
  • Commented on The Pivot
    A crop-duster (typical airspeeds of 200-300 mph) or even a turboprop (top speed about 400mph) tasked for CAS is still slow and will take precious time to get to a position requiring air support.The F-16 is the go-to plane for...
  • Commented on The Pivot
    The lump of wrought iron I've got in the workshop is rusty as hell but it's a lot harder than a piece of bearing bronze I have sitting on the shelf, a simple scratch test proves that. Any hammer-worked iron...
  • Commented on The Pivot
    Pretty much any iron produced by any process was better than the alternatives of bronze and brass. Using charcoal it's possible to melt and reduce iron ore with limestone, puddle it and work it to make wrought iron without requiring...
  • Commented on The Pivot
    A quick check on the Guardian reporting of the 2017 Labour manifesto doesn't mention nationalisation of anything. The one taking-back-into-public-ownership manifesto commitment mentioned is regional ownership of water with no central government involvement i.e. no "British Water" like British Rail,...
  • Commented on The Pivot
    There's nothing stopping any EU nation from nationalising or denationalising any part of its industrial base. There are rules about open markets across the EU for services and goods but that's it. There's a right-wing fantasy of the EU being...
  • Commented on The Pivot
    Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn is well aware that 20% or more of his party's reliable voters are UKIP-curious, xenophobic and in some cases out-and-out racists. He's not particularly anti-EU the way that many more Tory voters and Party members are...
  • Commented on The Pivot
    Most Brexit energy came from right-wingers and ultranationalists in the UK, not from the socialists and even the hard left who generally saw a closer union within Europe as a good thing. As for expecting competence and capability with regards...
Subscribe to feed Recent Actions from Nojay

Following

Not following anyone

Specials

Merchandise

About This Page

Find recent content on the main index or look in the archives to find all content.

Search this blog

Propaganda