Nojay

Nojay

  • Commented on Social architecture and the house of tomorrow
    Ah, the Thor reactor people? They've been dragging PowerPoint presentations around the funding venues for over a decade now with no luck other than some seed money for more Powerpoint presentations. The Big Thing in the Powerpoint reactor biz these...
  • Commented on Social architecture and the house of tomorrow
    Ummm, no -- Q is not just the heating energy, it's the total for control, magnetic field support and injection. ITER is not intended to produce electricity, the Q factor in its case is a measure of thermal energy out...
  • Commented on Social architecture and the house of tomorrow
    The Japanese JT60 tokamak managed D-D fusion in a campaign a few years back. They didn't reach the Holy Grail of Q greater than 1 but, it is claimed, if they had been set up to use D-T fuel they...
  • Commented on Social architecture and the house of tomorrow
    The real Holy Grail for fusion, at least in the first instance is Deuterium-Deuterium since the fuel can be easily sourced from water. D-D fusion can be achieved and has been[1] but the energy return is less than D-T. ITER's...
  • Commented on Social architecture and the house of tomorrow
    A "moped" as originally defined was a motorised pedal cycle. No-one who ever rode one ever pedalled it any real distance. Nowadays, at least in the UK the term "moped" also covers a motorcycle with no pedals as long as...
  • Commented on Social architecture and the house of tomorrow
    Comment 488 by "willieaames" is spam. [[ deleted - mod ]]...
  • Commented on Social architecture and the house of tomorrow
    The impression I got was that Shipstones were self-contained no-fuel magictech sources of electricity, "batteries" in that sense but not simple energy storage devices. Their capacity seemed to be great, almost infinite but not enough detail was given about them...
  • Commented on Social architecture and the house of tomorrow
    Hey, that's great! Germany's only emitting twice as much CO2 per capita as France after spending all that money on renewables. I wonder why France's CO2 emissions nosedived around the mid-1980s. Did they spend a lot on renewables back then?...
  • Commented on Social architecture and the house of tomorrow
    That money estimate is how much will need to be spent before the first watt of commercial fusion electricity is delivered into a grid, assuming there are no roadblocks or whoopsies in the way. It might be more, it will...
  • Commented on Social architecture and the house of tomorrow
    Popular Mechanics is the National Enquirer of technology, just sayin' The last prognostication that was worth a damn for "how long till commercial fusion" I heard was $80 billion. The breakdown of that figure was roughly $25-30 billion for ITER...
  • Commented on Social architecture and the house of tomorrow
    But in many applications it is way better to have a controlling outlet that can be reset without a hike to the breaker box. Basically GFCI has to be used anywhere someone might be able to get wet while using...
  • Commented on Social architecture and the house of tomorrow
    The British K-type plug is a lot safer for a lot of other reasons. For example the fuse in each plug can be rated for the device -- a desk lamp will have a 1A or 2A fuse, a computer...
  • Commented on Social architecture and the house of tomorrow
    Yes, crude and crappy switched-mode converters crammed into the base of a light bulb and cooked with several watts of heat for several thousand hours are unreliable, My experience pulling cheap failed LED bulbs apart is that they universally use...
  • Commented on Social architecture and the house of tomorrow
    The brew can include nitric oxide, nitrogen dioxide, nitrous oxide, nitric acid, nitrous acid(HONO), dinitrogen pentoxide(N2O5), peroxyacetyl nitrate(PAN), alkyl nitrates (RONO2), peroxyalkyl nitrates (ROONO2), the nitrate radical (NO3), and peroxynitric acid(HNO4). Alas, no octanitrocubane (C8(NO2)8). If a Biggest Breakthrough...
  • Commented on Social architecture and the house of tomorrow
    A week is a long time in politics, it's a problem in energy provision. We've just had a few days, about 60 hours in total when the total grid wind power capability of Britain was producing less than a GW...
  • Commented on Social architecture and the house of tomorrow
    The flat I live in has transoms but only over the doors to the two south-facing bedrooms. They're there to let natural light into the hallway, they don't open to let air or heat pass through. There's a light-well with...
  • Commented on Social architecture and the house of tomorrow
    France is the world's greatest exporter of electricity today. If you go by per-capita then Norway probably takes the no. 1 position in that regard although they export their surplus electricity in the form of refined aluminium. Norway has about...
  • Commented on Social architecture and the house of tomorrow
    Re: French nuclear power station fleet Today they produce about 85-90% of French electrical energy as well as supplying maybe 5-10GW for export. Right now as I type this they're feeding 3.85 nuclear GW to Green Germany since a calm...
  • Commented on Social architecture and the house of tomorrow
    "Buy land, son. They're not making it any more." Mark Twain, attrib. The population in 2119 absent a climatological disaster or significant meteor impact, plague, lots of wars etc. will be higher than now. Land for agriculture can't easily be...
  • Commented on Social architecture and the house of tomorrow
    By 1820 the corridor had become an unremarkable space around which homeowners were now structuring their lives. The older style of tenement, focussed on a windowless central room off which all other rooms opened, still existed but was becoming rarer....
  • Commented on The Inevitable Brexit Thread (2)
    It occurs to me that someone must have used metric, BSF/SAE/Imperial, and Whitworth in the same machine. Has anyone encountered such a sparkling crown of British automotive engineering? Not British, but reading up on a riveting project someone needed assistance...
  • Commented on The Inevitable Brexit Thread (2)
    Most Whitworth hex-head fasteners were the same dimensions as similar SAE bolts and the spanners were often dual-labelled. Excuse me for a moment -- one spanner that comes to hand is marked at one end 1/8"W (Whitworth) and 3/16" BSF....
  • Commented on The Inevitable Brexit Thread (2)
    There's an interesting deadline coming up -- Britain kinda likes to get all that democracy stuff over and done with in one go and now we're committed to holding elections for the European Parliament on 31st May which is seven...
  • Commented on The Inevitable Brexit Thread (2)
    I love that bridge! It provides so much entertainment. We have a low rail bridge on the road where I often work. It's 12 foot 9 inches clearance but confusingly it can't be seen from around the corner on the...
  • Commented on The Inevitable Brexit Thread (1)
    does anyone have some idea of the numbers on this claim? No idea. The HuffPost site wants me to open my system to their spam-rape engines and agree to lie back and enjoy it, apparently. Why don't you give us...
  • Commented on The Inevitable Brexit Thread (1)
    Yes, that's called a pump jet. The duct around the prop can be swivelled in all directions to direct the flow of water providing steering without rudders and other intrusive vanes causing drag. Reversing buckets on the ducts provide a...
  • Commented on The Inevitable Brexit Thread (1)
    Modern subs don't have exposed props since they make a lot of noise, especially at speed. They use pump jets, an underwater version of aircraft turbofans....
  • Commented on The Inevitable Brexit Thread (1)
    The absolute minimum is six weeks from the Writ being issued. It can be, and usually does take a bit longer. May is PM because she's the leader of the party (with allies) that can command a majority of the...
  • Commented on The Inevitable Brexit Thread (1)
    Actually well-informed speculation says that Britain and France know where the others on-station SSBN patrol and at the same time they don't know exactly where they patrol, a Heisenberg uncertainty of sorts. The patrol area for both SSBNs is a...
  • Commented on Three pieces of news about the Laundry Files (UPDATED!)
    Part of it is that India wants to be taken seriously and have a seat at the table when any treaties about the banning of ASAT weapons is being discussed. India in the form of ISRO has a decent, if...
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