Nojay

Nojay

  • Commented on Crib Sheet: The Delirium Brief
    From stories I've heard back when I was living near Glasgow and spending a lot of time in the city the usual method of cononating Lord Wellington these days involves a very long fishing rod or pole of some kind...
  • Commented on Crib Sheet: The Delirium Brief
    The cone on the horse's head needs holes cut in the base to fit over the horse's ears. It's usually one of the very big ones usually used on major road works rather than the 50cm-high street works cones and...
  • Commented on Crib Sheet: The Delirium Brief
    The queen and the swarm as a whole survive just fine, and harvest time is a nuisance rather than a bee apocalypse. The Bad News is that if infection or disease or an outside agent not directly under the control...
  • Commented on Crib Sheet: The Delirium Brief
    Edinburgh recently got a nice statue of a heavily-armed bear[1]. It's in Prince Street Gardens. [1]Wojtek the Polish Heavy Mortar Bear. Adopted as a bear cub by Polish forces in Iran it was smuggled into Italy and as it grew...
  • Commented on Crib Sheet: The Delirium Brief
    "It was buried in the papers" indicates what the SAS were doing in places like Oman and Belize wasn't common knowledge. Certainly if the dots were joined up certain conclusions could be arrived at but few if any actually spent...
  • Commented on Crib Sheet: The Delirium Brief
    The SAS had a presence in Afghanistan before the events of September 2001 kicked off the Greatest Temper Tantrum ever. They were doing intelligence collection on assorted nutters and gun-runners in the Afghanistan-Pakistan border, mostly. They spent several months leading...
  • Commented on Crib Sheet: The Delirium Brief
    The existence of the SAS was known, their operational activities through the 60s and 70s were less well-known to the general public. The Battle of Mirbat in 1972, for example, was an action that would have garnered at least one...
  • Commented on Crib Sheet: The Delirium Brief
    22 Coy(V) (reservists in Edinburgh). There was also 23 SAS(V) based in Glasgow at one time. One of their fellows was once drummed out of the Puritan forces during a Sealed Knot re-enactment event for excessive brutality. He hung around...
  • Commented on Crib Sheet: The Delirium Brief
    I am me because my memories of the past are about me, there is a continuity of existence as me. Bob may well be the Eater of Souls but he's still got continuity of memory as Bob, he thinks like...
  • Commented on Do my Homework
    Actually quite a few poor rural dwellers in China and India burn coal to heat their homes and to cook on since much of the locally available wood was stripped and burned a generation back when the population doubled and...
  • Commented on Do my Homework
    Investing in "going green" doesn't supply electricity to half a billion country dwellers in China whereas building coal-fired power plants does. Worked examples of "going green" such as Germany which has spent over 100 billion Euros on solar and wind...
  • Commented on Do my Homework
    Billionaires aren't the driver for climate change, it's half a billion poor Chinese peasants who want clean drinking water and electric light and schools and hospitals and all the other things rich countries have and who will burn coal and...
  • Commented on The Labyrinth Index: sneak preview!
    Doubling the range more than quadruples the error at point of impact for several reasons -- variability of wind and atmosphere conditions en route, the loss of velocity due to the extra distance travelled more than doubles the flight time...
  • Commented on The Labyrinth Index: sneak preview!
    What the article about the longest sniper shot didn't mention was the twenty or thirty attempts to get a bullet on target before the last one actually hit something. "Spray and pray", see. Effective range for a modern sniper rifle,...
  • Commented on Do my Homework
    The quad-110Ah battery pack I suggested is a low-cost starter kit, something that can be added to as requirements change or money becomes available whereas the Tesla Powerwall unit is a big lump of cash up front and maybe overkill...
  • Commented on Do my Homework
    The case is were the "inventory control label" was attached. They were fragile, silver labels that were counted during inventory every six months. They could not be pealed off, and put on a new printer, without damage. Bets? We had...
  • Commented on Do my Homework
    As a self-certified geek you could build a solar-charged battery pack yourself. $1500 US will get you four 110Ah 12V "maritime" lead-acid batteries for a 5kWh supply (although, like Li-ion they don't like being really deep-discharged so realistically 3kWh is...
  • Commented on Do my Homework
    Oh dear, another Biggest Battery Breakthrough Since Breakfast announcement. In Nature, of all things, not an engineering supply catalogue or production report. I see BBBSB reports and announcements all the time. I tend to poo-poo them since the rarely if...
  • Commented on Do my Homework
    I don't know that "millions of geeks" actually want an energy storage pack as big as a typical EV or even hybrid vehicle requires. For one thing where are they going to store it? Not indoors if they want their...
  • Commented on Do my Homework
    There's a thing with introduction of a new technology where the initial offerings are not much better than the established alternatives but it's obvious that the ramp up of the new tech will eventually outshine the existing well-developed competition. There's...
  • Commented on Do my Homework
    I've mentioned it before but EVs have a floor price for second-hand and pass-down models based on the value of the battery pack. If the battery is any good, and it has to be decent to provide useful range between...
  • Commented on "I doubt me an it be commercial."
    the cutting angle being the only difference between certain sizes of some imperial parts. Whitworth and BSF are 55 degree threads but everything else for steel fasteners after that, US, British and European metric are 60 degree and yes, you...
  • Commented on "I doubt me an it be commercial."
    Ratchet handles and socket sets are universally square Imperial, 1/4" up through 1" and beyond. The home workshop tops out at 3/4" drive usually, most folks stop at 1/2". The 1/4" hex socket is not uncommon for things like screw...
  • Commented on "I doubt me an it be commercial."
    How may here have pressed the threads of a bolt into their finger tip and used that to compare to other bolts? Not accurate enough for my purposes. I have on occasion put threaded fasteners on a high-definition flatbed scanner...
  • Commented on "I doubt me an it be commercial."
    I suspect it was a case of someone who really knew exactly what they were doing, just based on how easy it was to service and how reliable it was. Mostly it's Not Invented Here syndrome plus a lot of...
  • Commented on "I doubt me an it be commercial."
    clearly stamped with "Whitworth fine 5/16 RH" and LH, or something similar, kept in an old cigar box with big writing on the front "SUMP PUMP IMPELLER TAPS. NOT WHITWORTH DO NOT USE". They were probably BSF (British Standard Fine),...
  • Commented on Do my Homework
    I can't remember the exact details but Terry Pratchett's "Dark Side of the Sun" posited the first intelligent (indeed super-intelligent) lifeforms came into existence a few milliseconds after the Big Bang and it was an endless succession of intelligence in...
  • Commented on Do my Homework
    the first man on the moon (it's always a man in those stories, although nobody in the 1950s thought to call the hero of a two-fisted space engineering story "Armstrong"), Ahem? The first line of "Rocket Jockey" by Lester...
  • Commented on "I doubt me an it be commercial."
    Whitworth has a 55-degree thread, meant to work in cast and wrought iron. All modern steel fasteners work with a 60-degree angle including metric and American Unified Thread types (what used to be called SAE in the old days), even...
  • Commented on Media Piracy and Unpronounceable Names
    I certainly handled such plastic coins in the early 1960s, going to the shop to buy groceries as well as getting them from my parents or even finding them in the street. The coinage probably grew out of the "milk...
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