Nojay

Nojay

  • Commented on Popcorn Time
    Worth mentioning that I have some consideration (sympathy is too strong, understanding perhaps) of the immigration argument that appears to have won the Brexit vote. A couple of vox pops in rather run-down areas have revealed that some folks voted...
  • Commented on Popcorn Time
    If Scotland goes heavily into renewables (wind mostly) then we're going to need gas, lots and lots of it to generate electricity when we need it. As the North Sea gas fields deplete then fracking is going to be the...
  • Commented on Popcorn Time
    The oil and gas is going away whatever happens, it's a sadly common failure mode of an extractable mineral resource since the resource gets extracted and not replaced. It's not good for small nations to get too dependent on such...
  • Commented on The internet of decay
    And I feel your pain about noise on sensors. I had a noise problem on a position sensor readout once -- the data was presented on a 16-bit parallel bus. What the manual didn't say was that the device had...
  • Commented on The internet of decay
    I think the original Atari ST prototypes had 256kb, the first release versions had 512kb. The OS on ROM was 192kb in size, the same as in the Mac. The Atari ST and the original Mac were similar enough that...
  • Commented on The internet of decay
    And you can show us an implementation of a complete single tasking OS with GUI in 192K (kilobytes, not megabytes or gigabytes) that's better? TOS or Tramiel Operating System although it wasn't single-tasking, it could round-robin. The Atari ST came...
  • Commented on The internet of decay
    The 68k chips had a problem in that a lot of the support chips the CPU needed to work as a system were late to market and/or buggy on first release, including the all-important 68851 memory management unit. The usual...
  • Commented on The internet of decay
    I did say "originally". People do the damnedst things -- I've seen a BASIC interpreter implemented as an Excel spreadsheet -- and Borland Turbo Pascal has a long and storied history in production code. I even wrote a robotics embedded...
  • Commented on The internet of decay
    Modula-2 put pointers back in explicitly. I programmed in both languages and avoided pointers like the plague generally despite using assembly language on a regular basis where pointers are part of the daily grind (and a lot less obvious to...
  • Commented on The internet of decay
    I once inherited a piece of code written in Fortran. It had an single-element array A[1] declared as the first variable and not referenced anywhere else in the code. It turned out this was a leftover hack that allowed user-space...
  • Commented on The internet of decay
    I got nine networks on my Kindle tablet but I live in a block of flats. We don't have a wireless connection in this flat unless I deliberately power up a router to provide one when I need it so...
  • Commented on The internet of decay
    And as it turned out encryption didn't stop dictionary attacks -- the file holding passwords was world-readable in Unix, the algorithm used to encrypt words was known, it was easy to run dictionaries and lists of common words, names and...
  • Commented on The End of the British nuclear deterrent?
    Still what you are describing is in essence a big mortar. That's a lot easier and cheaper than an ICBM, I'd say... Pakistan has mobile IRBM launchers about the size of an articulated lorry (ObUS: semi trailer) and I assume...
  • Commented on The End of the British nuclear deterrent?
    My regret is that we didn't know enough (or pay our deposit quickly enough) to specify a CAT5 cable run within the new house. You'd probably want to rip Cat5 out now and pull fresh Cat5e or Cat6 cable now...
  • Commented on The End of the British nuclear deterrent?
    Why is plutonium Bad News while mercury from coal-burning is Business As Usual? (Substitute nitrous oxides, particulates, dioxins, heavy metals, radon etc. for mercury as desired). Plutonium isn't particularly toxic compared to, say, beryllium (14,000 tonnes of which gets burnt...
  • Commented on The End of the British nuclear deterrent?
    Do you have any idea how much the current cost estimations for decommissioning power reactors are? Yes, for a single 500MW-1GW power reactor it's about 400-500 million dollars US. I understand bullshitters and Chicken Littles claim otherwise but they're bullshitters...
  • Commented on The End of the British nuclear deterrent?
    The US military experienced a surprisingly large number of fatalities during the recent Short Victorious War in Iraq due to their squaddies fitting their Humvees with hillbilly armour in an attempt to survive IED attacks. The result was a lightweight...
  • Commented on The End of the British nuclear deterrent?
    You got my hopes up that open season had been declared on fossil carbon burners, no tag limit but no... Toshiba is in the financial shit with its light-water reactor projects, the ABWR in particular which is a shame as...
  • Commented on The End of the British nuclear deterrent?
    Slip of the keyboard but Minnesota and Missisippi have bomber fields, IIRC so I can pretend it was a convenient conflation for flyover-country states that host Federal-dollar welfare projects....
  • Commented on The End of the British nuclear deterrent?
    Oddly enough when missions to bounce the sand happen they tend to be flown from airbases in Missesota in thirty-hour round trips rather than cycling planes from more convenient locations. It may be a political thing to appease native populations...
  • Commented on The End of the British nuclear deterrent?
    RAF Fairford is maintained in order to host visiting Strategic Bombers with 24hrs notice I'd expect them to bring a packed lunch rather than getting forward-deployed without their B61 bento boxes and stocking up at Fairford. Reloads are another matter...
  • Commented on The End of the British nuclear deterrent?
    I'm not sure the US still has nuclear weapons held in airbases on British soil. The ground-launched cruise missiles based at Greenham Common and one other base (?) are long gone, what would be left is free-fall tactical weapons if...
  • Commented on The End of the British nuclear deterrent?
    I've toured the Akashio which is located in the car park of the Japanese Maritime Defence Forces museum in Kure, south of Hiroshima. It's a 1980s teardrop hull diesel/electric sub, since replaced by acoustic-tile slab-sided modern subs. Remarkably for a...
  • Commented on The End of the British nuclear deterrent?
    "ore-zone aquifer" -- that's a strata of permeable rock, usually something like sandstone sandwiched between two impermeable rock layers, rich in uranium salts and a billion years of radioactive decay products and what the leaching operation is intended to extract....
  • Commented on The End of the British nuclear deterrent?
    Leaching isn't fracking and isn't being considered for rock strata that are part of aquifers. It's more straight up-and-down drilling into uranium-rich strata at significant depths. If you're worried about aquifers worry about all the ones that already have thousands...
  • Commented on The End of the British nuclear deterrent?
    Both/all sides already have a good idea of the patrol areas of the other people's boomers but it tends to be a box about a thousand kilometres on a side and a a few hundred metres deep and that's a...
  • Commented on The End of the British nuclear deterrent?
    the 233U it produces is a better breeder fuel than either 235U or 239Pu, because it produces more spare neutrons per fission event Excerpted from the IAEA website and tidied up a bit: ---------------------------------------------- Average number of neutrons emitted...
  • Commented on The End of the British nuclear deterrent?
    No cornucopia is needed to fuel a complete generation of light-water reactors operating for about a century or so, the best working estimate for the operational lifespan of new-build units (i.e. anything built since about 2005). Even if we pull...
  • Commented on The End of the British nuclear deterrent?
    I'm assuming a massive increase in fission nuclear power takeup once most of the available fracked and conventional gas sources have been exhausted and coal-burning has been relegated to minor third world powers and Germany. CO2 levels in the atmosphere...
  • Commented on The End of the British nuclear deterrent?
    Uranium is currently cheap to produce -- at the moment profitable mines sell yellowcake (U3O8, the minehead product) on the world market at $25 per lb (it's a US market hence the weird mass unit), or about $55 per kilo....
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