Mark Schaffer

Mark Schaffer

  • Commented on Report on Seat 14C
    "the crappy movie "Millennium", and the somewhat less crappy novelization of the same name, by Varley" That's a bit harsh - I thought the novel was pretty good, maybe not in the same league as Varley's best, but a nice...
  • Commented on Crib Sheet: The Nightmare Stacks
    The "human self-domestication" thesis is speculative, but is taken seriously by some serious people other than Pinker. Here's a link to a great symposium (videos of the talks) on domestication and human evolution: https://wn.com/carta_domestication_and_human_evolution_-_robert_franciscus_craniofacial_feminization_in_evolution The talk by Wrangham (yes, same...
  • Commented on Rejection Letter
    Just saw your comment above that in Wadham's book 'the certainties encompass "agriculture goes away" by no narrow margin'. If that were his explicit assessment in the book, and he had explained it at some length, then I'd go there....
  • Commented on Rejection Letter
    OK, that's a start, thanks. I guess I'm looking for a paper or literature that takes the global perspective, along the lines of (apologies, simplifying/guessing here) "we have net losses to agriculture in locations X because of mean temperature increases,...
  • Commented on Rejection Letter
    Thanks, getting closer to my sought-after shortcut (if you don't mind indulging me one more time). Can you point me to something in this literature that looks at the total impact and the prospect of losing agriculture everywhere (or nearly...
  • Commented on Rejection Letter
    There's mountains of stuff out there on climate change, agriculture and food security, looking at all kinds of impacts in all kinds of areas. And I'm just an interested amateur. What I was looking for specifically was something to read...
  • Commented on Rejection Letter
    Too bad, it sounded promising. If you don't mind, can I move it to the next link in the chain and ask who Wadhams cites (if anyone) in the process of "noting that it's generally accepted that 2 C of...
  • Commented on Rejection Letter
    How much discussion does Wadhams devote to agriculture in his "A Farewell to Ice"? Book looks very good from the various reviews I read, but the blurbs and reviews refer mostly to the Arctic and climate in general. The only...
  • Commented on We get mail (contd.)
    If you want to see some back-and-forth, there was a special issue of Politics, Philosophy and Economics in 2006 with commentaries by Gintis and Seabright on a Binmore book (Natural Justice) with a response by Binmore. All article-length so a...
  • Commented on We get mail (contd.)
    How about Ken Binmore (1996), "Evolution of Fairness Norms", Nordic Journal of Political Economy, open access version here: http://www.nopecjournal.org/NOPEC_1996_a12.pdf If you like this kind of economics, and you like book-length format, I can also recommend: Sam Bowles and Herb Gintis...
  • Commented on Popcorn Time
    "Why would Krugman have needed to specify any models?" Err... because in that particular blog post he was trying to explain how Arrow's model worked? He has plenty of other data-oriented evidence-based posts on healthcare, but that wasn't the point...
  • Commented on Popcorn Time
    'Krugman has a good summary here:' That's not quite fair: I meant Krugman had a good summary of Arrow's 1963 argument, not a good summary of today's healthcare debate and evidence. He's got lots of other blog posts where he...
  • Commented on Popcorn Time
    The Washington Post quote is a little too slick, in that his existence proof also showed just how many strong assumptions were needed. Others were rash in taking the the proof too literally and using it to justify market solutions...
  • Commented on Popcorn Time
    My pleasure. Maybe we economists should cite Arrow more often when we try to explain what we do, or to be more accurate, what we should be trying to do. He was an ideal role model. I wish your film...
  • Commented on Popcorn Time
    Lurking economist here... An awful lot of what gets labelled "economics", and who gets labelled "economists", isn't/aren't. "Supply-side economics" [sic], mentioned above, is a good example. Paul Krugman (left-leaning mainstream economist, Nobelist, and Charlie fan) regularly trolls Greg Mankiw (right-leaning...
  • Commented on The iron law of development
    Maybe some misunderstanding above about Kremer, Romer, "rivalrous", etc. "Technology is non-rivalrous" is referring to a characteristic of information. If someone consumes a rivalrous good, it means there's less of it for everyone else. But ideas/inventions/information/etc are non-rivalrous - once...
  • Commented on Long range forecast
    And if you want to skip the discussion and just examine the data, you can find manufacturing and services shares of employment and GDP in graphical form in the Rowthorn-Ramaswamy working paper: https://www.imf.org/external/pubs/ft/wp/wp9742.pdf US, Japan, EU - p. 8. Hong...
  • Commented on Long range forecast
    Maybe one of the economist readers here could point at some authoritative data? Not exactly what you asked for, but maybe better. In the late 90s Bob Rowthorn and Ramana Ramaswamy wrote a few papers about the relationships between deindustrialisation,...
  • Commented on The present in deep history
    Well, the dozen-ish anthropologists who commented in the Wrangham et al. paper I linked to didn't call the cooking and fire thesis anything like "dumb, ignorant and pop-sci to the max". They took it seriously, even the ones who were...
  • Commented on The present in deep history
    Whoops, thanks for that. Stray ")." because I didn't put the link on its own line. Here's the original/shorter one, sans typo: http://ref.scielo.org/2qy3pv Happens deep deep time before fire. Maybe not, if H. naledi gets dated to 3 million BP....
  • Commented on The present in deep history
    Oh, and on ...although apparently the idea isn't original to him can you help with a reference for that? Not sealioning! I'm generally interested in this, and if someone else should be cited instead of or along with Wrangham et...
  • Commented on The present in deep history
    Here's another source for the Wrangham et. al fire and cooking thesis: "The Raw and the Stolen: Cooking and the Ecology of Human Origins", Richard W. Wrangham, James Holland Jones, Greg Laden, David Pilbeam, NancyLou Conklin-Brittain Current Anthropology, Volume 40,...
  • Commented on The present in deep history
    Replying to the last in the sub-thread, not RP's comment in particular... I'm a long-time mostly-lurker here. I used to have the same reactions to CD's posts as others on this blog, until the penny dropped and I thought, "What...
  • Commented on The present in deep history
    Ummm ... no. A full explanation of what Romer (and mainstream economics) means by "value" would be waaay too long and mostly off-topic. Unfortunately some of the Wikipedia entries on "value" aren't very good, but the ones for "opportunity cost"...
  • Commented on The present in deep history
    FWIW, the standard-ish view in the economics discipline these days is that if there are limits to economic growth, they are very, very far off. It's not a denial of physical limits. It's rather than growth means growth in economic...
  • Commented on Bad puppies, no awards
    Apologies for the geeky correction, but (a) it's not a great idea to use correlation coefficients with GDP and energy because these two time series are nonstationary and cointegrated (sorry ... have a look at the Wikipedia entry for cointegration...
  • Commented on Data, books, and bias
    Well, I'm not sure about the "we" and "what we never talk about". I'm an academic economist and we teach this stuff all the time - we call it "market failure", not "Tragedy of Markets", and it's all over the...
  • Commented on Data, books, and bias
    Indeed, the Tragedy of the Commons is not BS, nor is the study of mechanisms to overcome it. And Ostrom's work on this is not unappreciated in at least some parts of the economics profession. A very nice discussion of...
  • Commented on Data, books, and bias
    Sorry for going all geeky, but stepwise regression is considered Bad Practice by statisticians et al. Here's a comment by Andrew Gelman (statistician), who characterises it as "a bit of a joke", followed by a long discussion on his blog:...
  • Commented on Ia, Ia, Google Fthagn
    In case it's useful - the first time it came up, I was very suspicious because I didn't recognise the link, nor could I see a connection between the message/link and this blog....
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