Heteromeles

Heteromeles

  • Commented on Social architecture and the house of tomorrow
    The problems I can see with this aren't with the thorium, although I'd love to see a working reactor before anyone buys this. Big problems are siting and upkeep. They want to tow this to a marina, attach it permanently...
  • Commented on Social architecture and the house of tomorrow
    Then they're going about it the wrong way. The 14th Amendment states, “All persons born or naturalized in the United States and subject to the jurisdiction thereof, are citizens of the United States and of the State wherein they reside.”...
  • Commented on Social architecture and the house of tomorrow
    Not really. If you look at non-violent revolutions, making the totalitarian regime the object of ridicule is a standard tactic. And yes, I really suggest it's worth looking at what groups like Otpor! did and why they did it. Getting...
  • Commented on Social architecture and the house of tomorrow
    Biosphere runs on both production and reproduction. And yes, of course it's about power, but ridicule is about power too....
  • Commented on Social architecture and the house of tomorrow
    Thanks for the Catholic Bioethics link. Even the summary is interesting, especially the last two sentences: "For all intents and purposes, there is a biological continuum stretching from the single-celled zygote to the infant human being. This ontological continuity seems...
  • Commented on Social architecture and the house of tomorrow
    inspiration for the day. There's an interesting topic for the SF writers in the crowd: this perspective essay in the WaPo: If a fetus is a person, it should get child support, due process and citizenship. Great points about the...
  • Commented on Social architecture and the house of tomorrow
    Cheeto Grande and the Walrus of Doom? It has a certain ring to it....
  • Commented on Social architecture and the house of tomorrow
    Oh, and a lazy way to leach acorns? I haven't tried it, but I understand that you can shell the little buggers to get the nut out, put those nuts in a lingerie bag, and put that bag in the...
  • Commented on Social architecture and the house of tomorrow
    Um, I think you're a little wrong about the acorns. Granted, yes, chestnuts used to produce more nuts than do eastern oaks, IIRC those acorns were still used. Also, don't forget about hickories. In California, acorns are far from a...
  • Commented on Social architecture and the house of tomorrow
    You might want to add this link too: https://advances.sciencemag.org/content/5/5/eaaw1947 Quote: "One hypothesis about crop domestication in Africa suggests an origin encompassing a large area from Senegal to Somalia (2). This Sahel-wide hypothesis was mainly based on distributions of wild and...
  • Commented on Social architecture and the house of tomorrow
    I know you like to argue, but I find myself wishing you'd think a bit more first. It makes for better arguments. As for African crops, read up on them. That's all I'm going to say. And read up on...
  • Commented on Social architecture and the house of tomorrow
    Wikipedia arguments are better, I'm afraid. First off, you're assuming that there's an infinite supply of water behind each hydrant, so that if you turn on ten hydrants in a line (meaning all attached to the same water main) you...
  • Commented on Social architecture and the house of tomorrow
    And on the other end, there's the use of a captive bolt pistol, which typically stuns in less than a few seconds and often kills too, even though it's an air gun. Why are we arguing about this? I'm sure...
  • Commented on Social architecture and the house of tomorrow
    The problem with acorns especially is that they don't produce in bulk every year. When they produce they're a wonderful crop where you can harvest a year's worth of food in about three weeks (California Indians). When they don't produce,...
  • Commented on Social architecture and the house of tomorrow
    Getting back to a more general question on food: what is the place of grains (especially rice, corn, and wheat) in civilization. Several historians, including James Scott (Against the Grain) and Rachel Laudan (Cuisine and Empire: Cooking in World History)...
  • Commented on Social architecture and the house of tomorrow
    Or just put a bolt through their brain when they're in the cage. That's much faster than asphyxiation, and almost certainly induces a lot less suffering. Remember that it takes a human 6 minutes to die from oxygen deprivation, and...
  • Commented on Social architecture and the house of tomorrow
    It's interesting, because my partner complains more about the fake meat than anything else when I try to get us eating more vegan (granted, this may be an excuse for her not wanting to eat vegan food). I think there's...
  • Commented on Social architecture and the house of tomorrow
    Maybe. I've certainly thought similar thoughts. I've wondered if things like sponge steel (semi-solid tools with a tough rind and a sponge inside) might be useful. The challenge is processing speed. I don't think that a microbial culture can grow...
  • Commented on Social architecture and the house of tomorrow
    Sorry, this is what I mock as the "cook it, wave a magic wand over the cauldron, and it all goes away" solution. To start with, you seldom get enough heavy metals to make it worth extracting them and selling...
  • Commented on Social architecture and the house of tomorrow
    Just in general, one of the difficult problems is that there's typically a hard trade-off between resilience and productivity. The classic example is that a hunting and gathering (or as I prefer, foraging) lifestyle is extremely resilient to a number...
  • Commented on Social architecture and the house of tomorrow
    "Avalon" is the main city on Catalina Island, off the coast of Southern California. It's got a major fresh-water problem. It's big-enough that this shouldn't be the case, but the geography is such that a proper watershed just hasn't developed....
  • Commented on Social architecture and the house of tomorrow
    Since I have a relative who works on solid waste administration in LA County, I can tell you with certainty that there are hundreds, if not thousands, of "close the loop" recycling schemes out there. Most of them turn out...
  • Commented on Social architecture and the house of tomorrow
    Acre per second... That's 43560 square feet, or a square about 208 feet on a side. IF it's growing by those squares, then...208 feet/sec=228kph, which is unbelievable. That's the point of the size of the fire. I fully believe that...
  • Commented on Social architecture and the house of tomorrow
    While this article isn't totally wrong, it has gems like "You can’t outrun a wildfire burning at full speed; some grow an acre a second, some three times faster still." This has Trumpian levels of factual accuracy. An acre per...
  • Commented on Social architecture and the house of tomorrow
    Ah yes, the idiot problem, the bane of all environmental solutions. As an example, ideally we should be able to hot process and compost all sewer waste and put it on fields, thereby closing the phosphorus cycling loop. In practice...
  • Commented on Social architecture and the house of tomorrow
    Dammit, Bezos just stole my idea for the villains in a space opera. Too bad it was so effing obvious. And no, Earth won't be left as an idyllic park, unless you're a fan of Orion's Arm. Since the 80s,...
  • Commented on Social architecture and the house of tomorrow
    The lesser problem is that nature's not a theme park, despite too many attempts to make it so. This actually is a huge problem when people treat parks as consumerist entertainment and get grumpy when stuff doesn't happen "because they...
  • Commented on Social architecture and the house of tomorrow
    Yes, basically development companies work the way you describe. Unless they're building downtown high rises. Still, I'd be careful about assuming that it's as simple as you describe. One thing I've learned is that there are massive smokescreens, politics, and...
  • Commented on Social architecture and the house of tomorrow
    Yeah, Australian bushfires still are the gold standard for WTFedness for me. I fairly regularly quote the world record for an ember throw starting another fire: held by Australia, and set during the 2009 Black Saturday Fires, specifically the Bunyip...
  • Commented on Social architecture and the house of tomorrow
    Not a hell of a lot of rebuilding where I've lived. But the construction and real estate industry REALLY WANT to rip places down, and build new.... Around here, the building industry prefers taking undeveloped land and building high end...
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