Elderly Cynic

Elderly Cynic

  • Commented on What can possibly go wrong?
    You may have missed the joke! 72 degrees (i.e. division in 5) is provably impossible using paper folding. Which makes it interesting that pentagonal symmetry is fairly common in nature....
  • Commented on What can possibly go wrong?
    72 degrees is the classic example :-)...
  • Commented on What can possibly go wrong?
    I don't. I merely can't speak for other countries, due to limited experience with buying shoes or even clothing there....
  • Commented on What can possibly go wrong?
    Don't you bet on it. Round about 1960, the only way a retailer could restock was by sending the card back from a pair of shoes that was sold; many of them had everything except the common sizes, because their...
  • Commented on What can possibly go wrong?
    I agree about the lack of a category, but I have met several people from South America (especially Argentina). Of course, the Cambridge research arena is as cosmpolitan as you can get, and nobody bothers to categorise....
  • Commented on What can possibly go wrong?
    There have been and still are some - e.g. the Quakers. But I accept they are a small minority, the general situation is as gasdive says in #173, and I stand by my position that the so-called Christian fundamentalists do...
  • Commented on What can possibly go wrong?
    I suggest that you (a) read the first quote in context and (b) learn that Exodus is not one of the Gospels. The Gospels aren't all lovey-dovey, by any means, but teach the opposite of what both the so-called Christian...
  • Commented on What can possibly go wrong?
    Agreed. It would be a great improvement if the so-called Christian fundamentalists actually tried following the teaching in the Gospels....
  • Commented on What can possibly go wrong?
    Your system was a newcomer. I go back far enough that mental arithmetic and Euclidean geometry were examinable subjects - though both were removed from the exams before I took them. Before Mathematica? Heck, before Macsyma. But not before computers...
  • Commented on What can possibly go wrong?
    Yes. But the New Testament account of the crucifixion is itself fake news, as that was the Roman punishment for rebellion etc. - the punishment for (Jewish) heresy was stoning - the historical and Christian Jesus don't match up. However,...
  • Commented on Unforeseen Consequences and that 1929 vibe
    Could well be. Your last sentence makes me wonder how safe Sealand is - it should be assailable within the MoD's budget :-)...
  • Commented on Unforeseen Consequences and that 1929 vibe
    Er, you aren't usually that Internet-challenged :-) https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_the_Falkland_Islands#Early_colonisation...
  • Commented on Unforeseen Consequences and that 1929 vibe
    You have missed my point. I am referring to ANOTHER country that claims a territory based on one interpretation of history, flatly in conflict to the wishes of the majority of the population and another, equally valid, interpretation of history...
  • Commented on Unforeseen Consequences and that 1929 vibe
    "Even having fucked up, all they needed to do to prevent the invasion was repeat Operation Journeyman." Yes. Or even (in the case of the submarines) just SAY they had! That is exactly what I would have done, and kept...
  • Commented on Unforeseen Consequences and that 1929 vibe
    As you say :-( I used to block javascript, but had to stop doing that because of the number of critical sites it disabled. I have just started again, and immediately discovered that I have to exempt www.antipope.org to post...
  • Commented on Unforeseen Consequences and that 1929 vibe
    How can a TECHIE do so? I have noticed such effects, recently, and assumed that it was abominations like Google Analytics (which I know causes such browser havoc). In the UK, running data mining is TECHNICALLY illegal under the Computer...
  • Commented on Unforeseen Consequences and that 1929 vibe
    It came out after the episode, for those who were watching closely. Remember that the British government (and I don't mean those arseholes in Westminster, let alone Downing Street) is THE most skilled in the world at making evidence fade...
  • Commented on Unforeseen Consequences and that 1929 vibe
    A sign that is used in some parts of the world is "Elephants have right of way"....
  • Commented on Unforeseen Consequences and that 1929 vibe
    To be fair, I don't think that Carrington actually KNEW that things had progressed as far as they had - my understanding from what came out was that the FCO had been negotiating that without keeping the minister fully informed...
  • Commented on Unforeseen Consequences and that 1929 vibe
    A good question. The question is whether the actions were likely to do more harm than good, both for the populations concerned and more generally, over what timescales, and that's not clear. Dictatorships and other tyrannies pass, eventually. In the...
  • Commented on Unforeseen Consequences and that 1929 vibe
    Because something is legal doesn't make it justified. While I don't agree with him, I could make a strong case that it is not HIM who is the traitor, but the people who have sold the UK out to foreign...
  • Commented on Unforeseen Consequences and that 1929 vibe
    Yes. Spotting the fundamental flaw in von Neumann's debiasser is left as an exercise for the reader. While such approaches definitely help, they don't actually stop direct attacks on the encryption - indeed, for small-block approaches (32 bits), they don't...
  • Commented on Unforeseen Consequences and that 1929 vibe
    Actually, it is trivial to add to things like Emailers, but I agree that making it optional means that it won't be used when it matters. There are two good reasons to avoid it: The first is that it stops...
  • Commented on Unforeseen Consequences and that 1929 vibe
    Wubba, wubba, wubba! WHAT decade are you referring to? The OPERATOR is required to remember to change the key? Such things have been programmed (using fully functional computers) for the past 60 years, and haven't been done any OTHER way...
  • Commented on Unforeseen Consequences and that 1929 vibe
    Yes, and traffic analysis. They close one class of attacks, provably, but do nothing about the others. No Such Agency etc. don't like people using them because they can't decrypt them, but I don't believe that's a major reason. Arguably,...
  • Commented on Unforeseen Consequences and that 1929 vibe
    No, Kushner will NOT have been talking to the Saudis about a Palestinian state. The Saudis don't give a fuck about the Palestinians, and are currently joined at the hip to Israel, based on their common hostility to Iran. That...
  • Commented on Unforeseen Consequences and that 1929 vibe
    I certainly tried to :-) Whether XOR is adequate is interesting. If the components are already well-hashed and uniformly distributed in any number of bits, XOR is fine. If they aren't, it isn't. But it doesn't weaken the strongest component...
  • Commented on Unforeseen Consequences and that 1929 vibe
    Yeah, right :-( 'A secure legal framework'? And who enforces that? A while back, the UK government was telling academics that we were going to have to used signed Email, using a trusted third party mechanism. I helped to kill...
  • Commented on Unforeseen Consequences and that 1929 vibe
    Nah. They can put anything they want into the contract - it's your choice whether to sign it. Oh, all the banks have the same restrictive practices (by PURE chance)? Don't use a bank, then. That's UK law in a...
  • Commented on Unforeseen Consequences and that 1929 vibe
    Yeah. And I am tall enough that, in order to not bash the steering wheel, column controls and gear lever with my knees, my shoulders have to be behind the door column - I had to take the test remembering...
Subscribe to feed Recent Actions from Elderly Cynic

Following

Not following anyone

Specials

Merchandise

About This Page

Find recent content on the main index or look in the archives to find all content.

Search this blog

Propaganda