Ru

Ru

  • Commented on Excuses
    b) Greg's house, which has a smart meter containing a small amount of software that's been carefully checked, that I can only get to by first hacking through the network of the grid above because the meter has no direct...
  • Commented on Excuses
    There is no such ting as a "Smart meter fit for purpose" There is no technical reason why there couldn't be. They are, quite simply unnecessary Oh. When are you intending to unveil your giant flow battery plant or fusion...
  • Commented on Excuses
    If anything's lagging in the "corresponding rush" it's the EV side of things. There's a certain amount of infrastructure that's needed, too, only any sort of "smart grid" project seems to be primarily designed to let software bugs crash your...
  • Commented on Bread and Circuses (circumlunar version)
    (incidentally, I should probably point out that I think the idea of mining the moon with plausible near future technology is a very silly and pointless one, just less silly and pointless than trying to do the same thing around...
  • Commented on Bread and Circuses (circumlunar version)
    You do have the problem of landing (expending a lot of fuel in a hurry) and taking off again against a constant gravitational field which means you can't fly a very fuel-efficient slowboat trajectory as you can away from an...
  • Commented on Bread and Circuses (circumlunar version)
    First off, magbeam satellites (or any beamed power from space) really aren't going to be a factor any time soon. You need many gigawatts to power such a rapid change in kinetic energy, and satellites are low-energy affairs More like...
  • Commented on Bread and Circuses (circumlunar version)
    it's still going to cost trillions and take decades and a lot of launches to get enough hardware in place to start the process I'm going to go out on a limb here and suggest that bringing stuff back from...
  • Commented on Bread and Circuses (circumlunar version)
    How the fuck that can possibly be true, given that it's an inert gas, I cannot understand at all, but it is true enough that the stuff can be used medically. Plenty of of inert gases cause interesting biological effects......
  • Commented on Bread and Circuses (circumlunar version)
    I'm for NERVA, which, if I have it right, was actually ground-tested in the early seventies. And you'd want to ship it up, some assembly required, and *never* bring it down again. Spent fuel rods? Um, the Sun's thataway. Its...
  • Commented on Bread and Circuses (circumlunar version)
    This is the biggest revolution in power projection since the invention of the aircraft carrier. Is it, though? Projecting force via space seems to be a good way to make your neighbouring super-ish powers pretty twitchy. See also, arguments against...
  • Commented on Bread and Circuses (circumlunar version)
    The water-ice tankers from Saturn are propelled by LOX/LH2 motors using cryogenic gases cracked from water-ice in Saturn orbit using very large solar arrays, compensating for the reduced solar flux Out There. So you're still throwing away 90% of your...
  • Commented on Bread and Circuses (circumlunar version)
    So far as I know, almost every single one of those interesting alternative schemes involves inventing a new, more exotic form of nuclear reactor which combines lighter weight with increased power density. Nuclear rockets are almost as old as spaceflight,...
  • Commented on Bread and Circuses (circumlunar version)
    t's going to take ten years or more to get from there to Earth orbit, possibly involving a pass or two by Venus and/or Mars to lose some delta vee but barring accidents it WILL get there. It might consume...
  • Commented on Bread and Circuses (circumlunar version)
    The whole economic idea underlying their plans is that the ship is going to really be fully reusable, in the way people envisioned the Shuttle would be early on. That is, basically airliner style: just gas and go, with scheduled...
  • Commented on Bread and Circuses (circumlunar version)
    Nojay (et al) re: mining saturns rings: gasdive is right when they say that saturn's gravity well is pretty deep. I was hazarding a guess at needing about 10-15km/s delta-v to escape from the rings and return to earth, but...
  • Commented on Bread and Circuses (circumlunar version)
    My calculations suggest that by increasing the power density by about 10x, and using the Dawn mission craft as a baseline, you could accelerate/decelerate to the cumulative 10 km/s delta V in just 3 days, with larger, higher power density...
  • Commented on Bread and Circuses (circumlunar version)
    Musk's system bypasses the whole Isp issue by being based on in-flight refueling. If you start in LEO with full tanks and 7km/s Δv, there really are transits to Mars that are only 3 months, which is much faster than...
  • Commented on Bread and Circuses (circumlunar version)
    What's not to like? Well, the "and here a miracle happens ..." bit of chemical engineering in the middle. But that's about all. Yep. And for all that, it is still more likely than fleeing to some self-sustaining offworld colony....
  • Commented on Bread and Circuses (circumlunar version)
    I think it is pretty clear by now that man made climate effects aren't going to be stopped, so we might as well get colonising the solar system instead. Until climate change results in an atmosphere that resembles venus, colonising...
  • Commented on Houston: what are the long-term consequences?
    Pakistan. No mystery there. Whatever the situation may be wrt nuclear knowledge, when it comes to plain old missile technology it is well known that Pakistan helps NK out, to the extent that some NK missiles are just Pakistani ones...
  • Commented on Houston: what are the long-term consequences?
    A) The Russians ceased aiding NK in the 1960's (I can dig up the data). Someone's been selling rocket bits to the norks. They don't appear to have the skills to make an indigenous icbm, and the recent hwasong missiles...
  • Commented on Houston: what are the long-term consequences?
    The biggest hurdle appears to be just knowing it's possible to do something. Well, yes and no. The idea behind the teller-ulam bomb is pretty well known, and there's no reason why anyone who can get their hands on some...
  • Commented on Houston: what are the long-term consequences?
    ... suggest a two-stage device? It's so suggestive I'm suspicious of it, TBH. Yeah, I don't think that the good old teller-ulam design actually requires a radiation case like that. The US device rumoured to have a peanut-shaped radiation case...
  • Commented on Houston: what are the long-term consequences?
    Huh. I have no idea what I started to write there, with that shape thing, before I wandered off to double check descriptions and look at boring photos of metal casings. Probably nothing useful or intersting....
  • Commented on Houston: what are the long-term consequences?
    I thought an active nuke would have to be considerably larger than that ... There are certainly smaller pure-fission warheads (W54) and boosted fission warheads (W45) which are 50s-60s-era technology, so you might expect the norks to be able...
  • Commented on Houston: what are the long-term consequences?
    Science: it works, bitches! Indeed. Unfortunately, someone didn't seem to have heeded their own advice: The scientist who raised the alarm a year ago watched the waters rise and eventually force him out of his own flooded house. I hope...
  • Commented on Trapped in the wrong trouser-leg of time
    (and speaking of errors and mea-culpas, the model I just linked wouldn't apply to Venus at all which is probably a bit too far from the sun to receive enough tidal heat, so was wrong to bring that one up....
  • Commented on Trapped in the wrong trouser-leg of time
    Because of the small mass of red dwarfs, the planets in the NZ are close in. That means that most are tidally locked. Which means that they probably do not have protective magnetic fields. I finally found the paper I...
  • Commented on Trapped in the wrong trouser-leg of time
    Not even the decency to nod and say "Ok, well, thank-you, I'll have to re-think that now". Now I think about it, I don't recall the sonar/radio person ever so much as emitting a faint peep of embarassment. In fact,...
  • Commented on Trapped in the wrong trouser-leg of time
    Yeah, believe it or not, I know what I'm talking about. Shocking, isn't it? Now look at everything I ever type in the same manner. I remember, once upon a time, another commenter account on this blog being ever so...
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