Pigeon

Pigeon

  • Commented on Social architecture and the house of tomorrow
    I didn't even realise you could eat acorns until I read this series of posts. I'm used to thinking of them as something you feed to pigs because they're handy for that but no use for anything else....
  • Commented on Social architecture and the house of tomorrow
    Not comparable at all. There is a major difference between an anoxic atmosphere and a toxic one. I have a photograph in mind taken inside one of the Nazi gas chambers showing marks on the wall where people had tried...
  • Commented on Social architecture and the house of tomorrow
    See Charlie's comment @ 962. There is the well-known standard, "Unconscious in 2 minutes, dead in under 10" - but walking into a room full of nitrogen means losing consciousness not in 2 minutes, but in a few seconds, and...
  • Commented on Social architecture and the house of tomorrow
    The slaughterhouse method I favour is a room full of nitrogen - quick, easy and completely non-traumatic. Walk in, fall over, end of story. I don't see why it should be a bad thing that vegetarian menus should include imitation...
  • Commented on Social architecture and the house of tomorrow
    Porsche's first attempt was electric too. In the early days it was difficult to make internal combustion engines small and light without them also being crap, so it wasn't a given that a car would use one. Steam cars also...
  • Commented on Social architecture and the house of tomorrow
    I covered the energy bit - the energy comes from the sewage itself. Sewage, after all, mainly consists of water and fuel, plus odd bits of other things which may be interesting, whether in a positive or negative way. The...
  • Commented on Social architecture and the house of tomorrow
    OK, here's my idea for sewage processing... - Let the input stew in its own juice for a while, and collect the methane, until it's not producing any more. - Get rid of as much of the water as possible,...
  • Commented on Social architecture and the house of tomorrow
    It is quite likely that, even once the basic mechanism has been worked out, teleport machines will still be unviable for the transport of people, other biological entities, machinery, drugs, etc. etc., because of the Sidney's leg problem... but if...
  • Commented on Social architecture and the house of tomorrow
    "The head" refers to its traditional location on the ship - up near the bow. I guess the idea was to get an automatic flush every time you plunged into a wave....
  • Commented on Social architecture and the house of tomorrow
    Well, my observations are that we do not exclusively have separate tanks, instead we have a mixture of both types; that neither type has any particular difficulty clearing the bowl (as a class, though of course individual bad units exist);...
  • Commented on Social architecture and the house of tomorrow
    Any feature which is supposed to be helpful will cause you to waste at least an order of magnitude more time swearing at it than it ever saves you by actually being helpful....
  • Commented on Social architecture and the house of tomorrow
    "The bolts holding the tank against the seat had corroded/disolved... Why are separate tanks so popular in Europe?" In the UK, at least, I wouldn't have said that they were, but your own post emphasises a major advantage. In my...
  • Commented on Social architecture and the house of tomorrow
    The one you're thinking of... you mean the idea you mentioned at #633? I imagined from that something similar to the one in Greg's article - which as it says did carry the occasional passenger, though only as a stunt,...
  • Commented on Social architecture and the house of tomorrow
    "Further note that diesel is generally a lot more expensive per btu than electricity." (btu - aaargh) Uh? It's roughly the same... at the price it comes from UK petrol stations, which is about 80% tax. And in remote areas...
  • Commented on Social architecture and the house of tomorrow
    Not just the East Anglian Fenland of course. A whole lot of eastern England up to the Humber/York area used to be a soggy mess. There's the Somerset levels too. I think rather more of England amounts to "reclaimed land"...
  • Commented on Social architecture and the house of tomorrow
    Ah yes, Germany also being where they invented the po with a little shelf in it so you can poke through your turds looking for tapeworms......
  • Commented on Social architecture and the house of tomorrow
    Despite the supposition being repeated everywhere... IT WASN'T THE RATS! No doubt one or two did have a cheeky nibble, and sometimes got sucked inside the pipe, but they were no more than a minor nuisance. If they had been,...
  • Commented on Social architecture and the house of tomorrow
    "due to antiquated/slow rail infrastructure - the continental EU has serious high speed rail for turboprop-distance journeys" ...Whereas Britain does not have those distances at all, and the main problems with rail are ridiculous ticket prices, lack of capacity (which...
  • Commented on Social architecture and the house of tomorrow
    "I find it much easier to eat as much as I need if my requirements are above 3,000 Kcal/diem than if they are below 2,500, because I can fill my belly" Golly, I struggle to consume as much as 1500Kc/d,...
  • Commented on Social architecture and the house of tomorrow
    I have tended to find that it's the LEDs themselves that fail, due to overdriving and grossly inadequate heat dispersion. The ballast capacitor does not inspire confidence as it is an unsuitable type and disconcertingly physically small, apparently chosen by...
  • Commented on Social architecture and the house of tomorrow
    I think this thread is very well titled. Because (either we're all fucked or) "the house of tomorrow" will have to be "social(ised) architecture" - a thing for living in, and absolutely not a thing for making money out of...
  • Commented on Social architecture and the house of tomorrow
    "Do LED bulbs really need to be 120/240vAC?" High voltage fixed frequency AC supplies are far more suitable for LED lighting than low voltage DC. LEDs are current-driven devices, and need to be driven from a constant-current source (or reasonable...
  • Commented on Upcoming appearances
    That reminds me of some graffiti in a train toilet describing a particular train trip as "sheer hell", which some later graffitiist had altered to "sheer rancidity". I suspect that rather few of the people who subsequently saw that graffiti...
  • Commented on Upcoming appearances
    Yes, exactly, that's the kind of thing I was referring to with the propaganda about HTTPS being the be-all and end-all of security serving as misdirection to keep people from realising about other security threats which it does nothing at...
  • Commented on Upcoming appearances
    If you have a hooky provider, relying on HTTPS isn't good enough. Reasons include that plenty of sites don't use it, and that it's not unknown for a hooky provider to provide hooky root certificates so it can wedge HTTPS...
  • Commented on The Inevitable Brexit Thread (2)
    Agree completely about the HoL, except that I wouldn't describe its current form as completely useless - they're still better than abolishing it completely, which is why there are still occasional attempts inspired by the Commons to propagandise in favour...
  • Commented on The Inevitable Brexit Thread (2)
    Latest observation for the comments-by-Leavers-totally-disconnected-from-reality data corpus: (1) Corbyn is a Remainer and would guarantee another referendum; (2) having another vote would be antidemocratic. Yesterday. From my mum. Who isn't usually a fucking looney, nor a bigot, but exhibits both...
  • Commented on Upcoming appearances
    At what point between Charlie's server and your client are the packets going to be injected? The physical security of everything except the "last mile" is good enough that it makes no significant difference whether the data is encrypted or...
  • Commented on The Inevitable Brexit Thread (2)
    It's not that obfuscated in practice, because the redundancy in the statement as a whole makes the interpretation of the numeric part obvious. But you could considerably improve the ambiguity by using, for example, AUs per ILO standard working day....
  • Commented on The Inevitable Brexit Thread (2)
    My experience of bicycles is that all the threads are some bloody weird size which is exclusive to bicycles, so it is never possible to replace a lost nut with one off some different kind of machine, nor is a...
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