Graydon

Graydon

  • Commented on Story time!
    Agriculture breaks by 2030. (Agriculture is not doing well at all this year.) Nor do we have any prospect of rendering thermally uninhabitable land habitable again; that's Alien Space Bat/The Culture Shows Up territory. So we're not looking at yeoman...
  • Commented on Story time!
    The better choice would be to reactivate all those dying farm towns around the US, especially east of the Mississippi, The ENTIRE US east of the Mississippi is in the expected thermal excursion zone. (So is all of the inhabited...
  • Commented on Story time!
    It's amazing how little people having an oh-shit moment will think about the geopolitical implications of shifting the blame. At present, this doesn't look like there was a plan; this looks like extemporization. It might be multi-actor extemporization all the...
  • Commented on Story time!
    My money is on Saudi Arabia (get Trump to piss on the Shi'ites), possibly in collusion with Benjamin Netenyahu (who uses the Ayatollahs as a handy horror show to keep his internal Likudnik opposition in line). Outside odds: it's the...
  • Commented on Story time!
    "Do not needlessly multiple entities" includes "absent material evidence, don't attribute actors to events". The only thing we've got that's plausibly factual (maybe as much as 80% confidence) is the shipping company's assertion that the crew reported a "flying object"...
  • Commented on CMAP #16: Book Title Blues
    There's a substantial wheat crop from Peace River at 56 N. Field peas and canola, too....
  • Commented on CMAP #16: Book Title Blues
    The lethal temperature line (in North America) looks likely to be around 45 north, maybe as high as 50. That leaves pretty much the entire Canadian Prairie provinces. Won't be able to farm and probably won't be able to get...
  • Commented on CMAP #16: Book Title Blues
    A lot of soy in our future for sure. In order to farm, you have to know roughly when and how much it's going to rain. As soon as that's sufficiently uncertain, no farming of anything. It's not "farming gets...
  • Commented on CMAP #16: Book Title Blues
    Melting permafrost doesn't reveal farmland. People need to eat every day. The path to an industrial future requires everybody getting fed the whole time. The question isn't "will there be farmable soils in a thousand years?" (we can't tell.) The...
  • Commented on Story time!
    Stick with the golf club. Shinty stick. Possibly more Scots than golf and much more applicable to violence....
  • Commented on Social architecture and the house of tomorrow
    Solar's a poor choice for the latitudes that are likely to stay habitable. (But not necessarily the altitudes that are going to stay habitable; we might see a lot of solar up mountains.) One reason I'm keen on ocean wind...
  • Commented on Social architecture and the house of tomorrow
    That's the one I was thinking of. One of the interesting things about it is the mention that when the great socialist dream got started, whether or not you could scale linear optimization to the necessary degree was at least...
  • Commented on Social architecture and the house of tomorrow
    Socialism means people instead of the laws of economics decide what gets produced That's a constraint on the system. Value really does arise from exchange. (If nobody else wants it, it has no value.) We collectively know far more about...
  • Commented on Social architecture and the house of tomorrow
    The "precondition" for doing anything serious about climate change is world socialism. Absolutely not. Just because capitalism doesn't work doesn't mean socialism works. (It doesn't and can't. Where capitalism claims you can do everything the system needs with feedbacks, socialism...
  • Commented on Social architecture and the house of tomorrow
    but they are doing it exactly backwards & making things worse, rather than better What ought they to be doing? Any utilitarian analysis supports doing anything at all if it gets a reasonable-prospect-of-continuity machine civilization to 2100 CE. It's rather...
  • Commented on CMAP #16: Book Title Blues
    Have none of you encountered IR LED electric hobs? (Or is that what's being described as "ceramic"?) Dull-and-boring grade integrated stoves have those for one or two pot-positions out of four, hereabouts, usually the front two with a dual size...
  • Commented on Social architecture and the house of tomorrow
    "Après moi, le déluge!" They all expect to be dead before they run out of loot. This is in no way a rational calculation, it's not a conscious optimization, it's a blind need. Plus the US version at least figures...
  • Commented on Social architecture and the house of tomorrow
    Looking only at society and ignoring the environment from what I remember. That would be precisely why I found it intolerably optimistic. Jacobs was a brilliant and insightful thinker, so much so that the economists still mostly haven't managed to...
  • Commented on Social architecture and the house of tomorrow
    And as long as I'm in a Jane Jacobs mood, read Dark Age Ahead if you haven't already. A book I will admit to finding intolerably optimistic....
  • Commented on Social architecture and the house of tomorrow
    "Trench warfare" misses the events, I think. Trenches have been around since antiquity. The thing that was new about the Western Front in the Great War is that the front was continuous, and armies designed and trained for mobility got...
  • Commented on Social architecture and the house of tomorrow
    I would like to ask US government, excuse me, but did you just slash the only asset that was providing growth potential for the whole industry? Ouch. Well, of course. Huawei commits two unpardonable sins; they don't respect the conceptual...
  • Commented on CMAP #16: Book Title Blues
    My impression was that gordycoale was suggesting A/B testing different covers/titles for a single book. i.e. the actual story would be word-for-word identical. A major publisher might be able to arrange for that, but in general, the platforms for ebooks...
  • Commented on CMAP #16: Book Title Blues
    The major platforms do the series metadata in different ways (at a "you have to know which Dublin Core label they use for series title" sort of level) and it's changed over time. This is ... not entirely helpful, and...
  • Commented on Social architecture and the house of tomorrow
    None of the 13th, 14th, and 15th amendments have ever been consistently enforced. The neocons are going after the courts very hard, having figured out that the your rights are what a court will enforce. My expectation is that the...
  • Commented on Social architecture and the house of tomorrow
    You do realize that the definition of "citizen" is an explicit and conscious target of the neocon movement? Specifically, getting rid of birthright citizenship?...
  • Commented on Social architecture and the house of tomorrow
    And yes, of course it's about power, but ridicule is about power too. Only in a context where those being ridiculed and those doing the ridiculing are using the same construction of shame. Note how the modern right wing appears...
  • Commented on Social architecture and the house of tomorrow
    Going to biology for simple answers is rarely productive. And, well, the issue has nothing to do with facts. The issue is about who gets to perform what kind of gender imposition on what basis. Resolving that issue is complicated...
  • Commented on Social architecture and the house of tomorrow
    That all supposes logic. One of the things that's been happening more and more obviously is that, faced with an awareness that logic and the process of attributing facts (that big, collective, public, common effort) does not admit of the...
  • Commented on Social architecture and the house of tomorrow
    Eurasia, more than Europe, at least in the oaky regions. North American oaks (of which there are a considerable diversity!) don't generally produce edible acorns, though some do; the west coast acorn festivals look like the sort of thing you...
  • Commented on Social architecture and the house of tomorrow
    Acorns are historically primarily a mast crop -- pig feed -- like various other things like beechnuts. I suspect that people wanted the ham more than the acorns, because making acorns edible is much more work than driving pig. City...
Subscribe to feed Recent Actions from Graydon

Following

Not following anyone

Specials

Merchandise

About This Page

Find recent content on the main index or look in the archives to find all content.

Search this blog

Propaganda