Allen Thomson

Allen Thomson

  • Commented on Story time!
    I found the matrix notation difficult to work with (also dot and cross products) In the long-ago day when I was doing such stuff, I found that the Einstein notation was vastly easier to deal with. And Kronecker deltas and...
  • Commented on CMAP #16: Book Title Blues
    DFW terminal D I think is for international but there are a LOT of domestic only flights that also use it due to a gate shortage. We had the opposite experience in IAH a couple of months when our flight...
  • Commented on CMAP #16: Book Title Blues
    Electric radiant is the step up option. That's what I have now and actually it's fine. Yes, we had radiant for the past few years (now on community bottled gas) and were quite happy with it. Need to get more...
  • Commented on CMAP #16: Book Title Blues
    I think we'd usually call it "heating element" Doing a little checking, "burner" seems to be an acceptable alternative, but I'd have a bit of hesitation about applying that to electrical hotspots. After all, there's nothing burning there unless...
  • Commented on CMAP #16: Book Title Blues
    On the cooking front, can I just note that the terms "stove" and "oven" are linguistically ambiguous? As long as we're doing linguistics, I'll comment from an USAian perspective: "Oven" is the large parallelepiped heated from below with gas or...
  • Commented on CMAP #16: Book Title Blues
    or they were born out of state decades ago My father was born in 1906 on the AS&R concession in Aguascalientes, MX(gasp!). When the Mexican Revolution came along a few years later the gringos cleared out and the hospital...
  • Commented on Social architecture and the house of tomorrow
    By that measure the Brits do much better ... Handing over/back huge areas of the planet to the people who live there. No arguments that the Brits did much better on that score, but as a solicitation of opinion(*), how...
  • Commented on Social architecture and the house of tomorrow
    Utterly off topic, but this might be useful for worldbuilding. Summary: the sand on the beaches around Hiroshima Bay contains a heterogeneous collection of small glassy spherules... https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S2213305419300074 Excitingly, it opens up "[A n]ew avenue for research linking the chemical...
  • Commented on Social architecture and the house of tomorrow
    I absolutely LOATHE the autodecorrect features, partly because my working vocabulary is much larger than theirs, and partly because of the need to type in proper names and foreign works. Tell me about it. This very afternoon we were trying...
  • Commented on Social architecture and the house of tomorrow
    Incidentally, 20m is also the predicted sea level rise if Antarctica goes ice-free! Not that it's an immediate prospect, but isn't that more like 70m? Including, I guess, Greenland....
  • Commented on Social architecture and the house of tomorrow
    All this talk of upgrading/extending rail in Scotland/ England/(Wales?) reminds me that the Chinese Belt and Road Initiative is keen an doing that sort of stuff. Post-Brexit, maybe post-Union, the PRC might be interested in lending a helping hand....
  • Commented on Social architecture and the house of tomorrow
    D-D fusion can be achieved Indeed so. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ivy_Mike Probably want to throttle that back a bit....
  • Commented on Social architecture and the house of tomorrow
    As long as we're talking about fusion power reactors, I'd like to understand their tritium economy in the start-up phase and thereafter. I.e., currently discussed reactors mostly use the deuterium-tritium reaction to produce energy and then capture the neutron from...
  • Commented on Social architecture and the house of tomorrow
    On climate change: https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-019-01313-4 Permafrost collapse is accelerating carbon release In short, permafrost is thawing much more quickly than models have predicted, with unknown consequences for greenhouse-gas release. No particular surprise for the readership here, but a status report....
  • Commented on Social architecture and the house of tomorrow
    It took me a number of these posts to figure out that y'all use "pumpkin" as the generic, rather than "squash". You do have to watch out for local usage. When we lived in the Lower Rio Grande Valley, it...
  • Commented on Social architecture and the house of tomorrow
    The easy way to cook pumpkin is slice it in half, and place on cookie sheet cut side down. Bake at 350 for about 45 minutes, that depends on size so experiment. In the link they talk about scooping out...
  • Commented on Social architecture and the house of tomorrow
    On a related subject, in houses that are being heated we could care less about efficiency of electronics once we transition off of gas, since we'll be heating our houses electrically anyway. Yes, but the fraction of houses that are...
  • Commented on Social architecture and the house of tomorrow
    It's unexceptional today to come across an open-plan apartment, because (except for the very rich) we don't typically share our homes with servants Depends on where you are. Well-off-but-not-rich apartments in many Latin American countries frequently have maid's quarters, typically...
  • Commented on The Inevitable Brexit Thread (2)
    So I just mentally double whatever [meters per second] number they mentioned, and it's close enough to miles per hour for putting it in a familiar context A good conversion factor to remember, and thanks for it. Similarly, I like...
  • Commented on The Inevitable Brexit Thread (2)
    Her now, her then. Just because she hadn't come out didn't make her any less a woman. On a slightly SF-nal note, advancing medical technologies will presumably make that principle applicable to other forms of dysphoria. (To the good, IMO.)...
  • Commented on The Inevitable Brexit Thread (2)
    one of multiple unemployment measures taken See https://www.bls.gov/news.release/empsit.t15.htm for details. Also https://fred.stlouisfed.org/series/CIVPART/ and https://fred.stlouisfed.org/series/LNU01300060...
  • Commented on The Inevitable Brexit Thread (2)
    In 2008 we had the global financial crisis. That was fun, wasn't it? And we may get a chance to re-experience it: How regulators, Republicans and big banks fought for a big increase in lucrative but risky corporate loans The...
  • Commented on The Inevitable Brexit Thread (2)
    I am beginning to think that the reason why nobody seems to be able to get out of the current mess is that the current mess is the desired outcome. On a vastly smaller and less consequential scale than Brexit,...
  • Commented on The Inevitable Brexit Thread (2)
    If I was the other side of 50 years of age I'd be seriously thinking about emigrating at this point. You might want to check out Panama, particularly Panama City, David, and their exurbs. The quality of life there is...
  • Commented on The Inevitable Brexit Thread (1)
    will allow them to survive the coming disaster, perhaps becoming the lords of a new world. http://www.girlgeniusonline.com/comic.php?date=20190327...
  • Commented on The Inevitable Brexit Thread (1)
    Apparently some attention is being paid to the consequences of climate change. The style of this article is annoyingly boosterish, but the overall picture is interesting. https://gcaptain.com/wall-street-weather-risk From IBM and AccuWeather Inc. to outfits like Riskpulse, Jupiter and DTN, companies...
  • Commented on The Inevitable Brexit Thread (1)
    As an aside, if by some chance a sea level canal were to be attempted across Panama, the radically different tides on the Pacific and Atlantic sides would probably require some sort of control, likely locks. https://journals.lib.unb.ca/index.php/ihr/article/download/28478/1882521233...
  • Commented on The Inevitable Brexit Thread (1)
    (As used along the Panama canal to stop the Pacific draining into the Atlantic, or is it vice versa …) Not really. A major part of the Panama "canal" consists of the artificial Gatun Lake, which is 26 meters above...
  • Commented on The Inevitable Brexit Thread (1)
    Greg, the particular usage of "trust" you impute to the U.S. fell out of common use decades ago. Yes, AFAIK it lasted no longer than the 1920s, if that. These days it's most often used in the sense of...
  • Commented on The Inevitable Brexit Thread (1)
    My question: what percent of 65 and older UK folks have reliable access to the Internet, that is, can 'sign' an online petition? I'm guessing that the UK isn't a lot different from the US in that respect, in which...
Subscribe to feed Recent Actions from Allen Thomson

Following

Not following anyone

Specials

Merchandise

About This Page

Find recent content on the main index or look in the archives to find all content.

Search this blog

Propaganda