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TRX

  • Commented on Let's put the future behind us
    > Soylent Regardless of how their product might sell, the name is such a colossal marketing fail that they may have secured a place in history......
  • Commented on Let's put the future behind us
    > surrounded by food ( FISH ) & yet refused > to eat it & thus starved In the USA, today is a holiday officially recognizing such an event; British colonists who were prepared to starve rather than eat American...
  • Commented on Let's put the future behind us
    Archeologists have a habit of tagging anything they don't readily understand as "religious." I've wondered what some far-future archeologists would think of Mount Rushmore, or Crazy Horse, or the Gateway Arch, or why the pyramid on the Mississippi is...
  • Commented on Let's put the future behind us
    A quote I intended to post much earlier in the thread, from James Lileks: "Nothing quite says 'yesterday' like yesterday's 'tomorrow'."...
  • Commented on Let's put the future behind us
    Many of those "created" cities go well back into Tsarist times. They were likely founded to establish occupancy of their regions to oppose Chinese or Japanese territorial claims. Also, there was no other way to exploit Siberian mineral resources....
  • Commented on Oh dear
    > For starters, having the electronics in the bulbs > themselves is a bad, bad thing - they could be in > the lamps, no the bulbs. I guess the too-obvious solution would have been to use an adapter socket...
  • Commented on Oh dear
    > look as good Except LEDs are all freakin' BLUE, and they don't take long before they give me a screaming headache. I'm partially color blind, and I can't tell any difference between incandescents and flourescents, though the people who...
  • Commented on Oh dear
    > set-top boxes, You, too? Decades ago we had cable TV, which required a large converter box. It easily doubled as a small electric heater; you could see heat shimmers coming out of the vents, and the case was too...
  • Commented on Let's put the future behind us
    We do that now, in borderline-uninhabitable parts of Earth. The only thing is, it's a chain of micro-environments - home, car, bus station, train, subway, store, office building - all independently heated or cooled for habitability. "Outside" may be...
  • Commented on Oh dear
    Yeah, I've seen Gaiman's article before. But while an author is not his readers' bitch, if he wants people to pay money to read his work, the relationship isn't *that* different. This is a well-known phenomenon in the music...
  • Commented on Let's put the future behind us
    The key point here is that you volunarily entered a panopticon system. In fact, you paid to do it. And when you were ready, you left it. That's considerably different from having a panopticon imposed from without, that you...
  • Commented on Leading question
    > The rifle is still a rifle, there's still a knife stuck on > the end of it. ...and a Roman legionnaire would look at the rifle with bayonet and go, "Oh, look a verutum with a weird-looking shaft!" (depending...
  • Commented on Oh dear
    Peoples' ideas of security can be... strange. I once worked for a commercial pharmacy; the kind that deals directly with hospitals and nursing homes, not end users. They were *nuts* about security... except policy and practice were evidently handed...
  • Commented on Unwelcome reality excursion
    > what exactly are they doing that costs on > average twice as much per body Considering how much money gets frittered away in supposedly-scrutinized public budgets, my first guess would be that in a black budget, a substantially higher...
  • Commented on Unwelcome reality excursion
    The modern British surveillance state depends on cheap integrated circuit electronics. ICs were invented at least partially due to the "connection problem" prize money offered by the US Air Force, developed in the early ways with DoD funding, and...
  • Commented on The Curse of Laundry
    Just a bunch of geeks talking sh......
  • Commented on The Curse of Laundry
    Ah, yes, the proximity to the boss thing... C. Northcote Parkinson's book about the British colonial service politics still mapped directly into corporate IT when I was doing that sort of thing. For that matter, so did a book...
  • Commented on The Curse of Laundry
    The traditional place to hide a secret British organization tasked with repelling alien invaders is underneath a film studio......
  • Commented on The Curse of Laundry
    > RAM In the same timeframe, one of the US industry magazines reported a warehouse with a recent RAM shipment being hit and a couple of security guards being killed in the process. A couple of years later I got...
  • Commented on The Curse of Laundry
    > canon One of Fred Hoyle's books depended heavily on a "canon with a crown" as a plot point. It wasn't until much later I found out that a "canon" in that context was a type of priest....
  • Commented on The Curse of Laundry
    In this case, it was a real British book, from a British publisher, and possibly even a British writer, though it didn't actually say so. Such things occasionally pop up in used book stores and flear markets nearby, probably...
  • Commented on The Curse of Laundry
    > don't sweat the small stuff Somewhere in Archeological Filing System I have a British paperback police procedural, written in the early 1980s, if I remember right. Nothing particularly notable for the genre, except the protagonist and his mates are...
  • Commented on Metacommentary
    > Let's colonize the Gobi Desert first! Do you intend to buy it from the Chinese and Mongolians, or are you going to take it by conquest? Neither Mongolia nor China are particularly hard up for cash at the moment,...
  • Commented on Metacommentary
    > it would take an intentional act of fuckwittery > to cause a nuclear war [pauses to consider the current fuckwits in power] You're not exactly reducing my concerns......
  • Commented on Some thoughts on turning 50
    > revoke their license to be a parent. If only... A lot of places, you have to have a license to keep a dog, but all you need are functioning genitalia to be a parent....
  • Commented on The Curse of Laundry
    > With the one notable exception of Arthur C. > Clarke, none of them predicted mobile > telephones. Furthermore, not a single man > jack of 'em predicted smartphones That's because mobile telephones were real, as early as the mid-1960s....
  • Commented on Some thoughts on turning 50
    > Maybe we've become less ageist, or maybe I > still behave like my late-20s. When I was very young, I noticed early that adults were mostly sour and angry. I vowed never to become one. I've mostly avoided (that...
  • Commented on Some thoughts on turning 50
    > "It seems just like yesterday I was 21" My memory seems to be random-access. I don't remember things in any sequential fashion; a lot of times I remember something vividly, but have trouble placing it +/- five years. As...
  • Commented on Metacommentary
    >Newtonian dynaics. Note that Newtonian physics will accurately predict any humanly-observable events. It'll even hold up to a fair amount of instrumented scrutiny. It's only when you create more sophisticated measuring instruments that things start to go squishy. For practically...
  • Commented on Not a Manifesto
    Whale blubber is pretty tough stuff. I'm not sure it would be practical to remove it via a suction tube... but you never know until you try. I imagine the whales might object to the procedure unless you had...
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