D.J.P. O'Kane

D.J.P. O'Kane

  • Commented on Sometimes I don't know why I bother!
    Well, my Grand Unified Theory of Hitchens is that someone, somewhere, had the goods on him . . . and that's what accounts for his spectacular political meltdown after 9/11....
  • Commented on Sometimes I don't know why I bother!
    Yes, but at least she wasn't Christopher Hitchens (who apparently plagiarised his exposé of the Albanian from a local Indian journalist). Hitchens prostituted his (real and genuine) talents in the aid of promoting a war that not only killed up...
  • Commented on Sometimes I don't know why I bother!
    And who was Salvo D'Acquisto? It's quite a story. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Salvo_D%27Acquisto...
  • Commented on Sometimes I don't know why I bother!
    Here's another Eco quote, from the same essay ("Why are they laughing in those cages?"): Real heroes, thoes who sacrifice themselves for the collective good, and whom society recognizes as such (maybe some time later, whereas at the time they...
  • Commented on Sometimes I don't know why I bother!
    A cogent point there, Mr. Christian. Of course Guevara was a mass murderer, if the term has any meaning whatsoever. Alas, those who point this out tend to leave themselves open to attack on the grounds that they don't render...
  • Commented on Sometimes I don't know why I bother!
    I'm going to have to go 'citation needed' on your last paragraph. Stranger things have happened in Irish history, but I'd need to have a bit more solid evidence before taking that one at face value. Don't forget either that...
  • Commented on Sometimes I don't know why I bother!
    I did consider nominating myself, but decided that would be gauche. So you'll have to wait, I'm afraid, until I tell all in my forthcoming memoir "The Life and Strange Adventures of D.J.P. O'Kane". I will nominate, however, Eleanor of...
  • Commented on The iron law of development
    Thanks for this, but I think that's a different firm than the one who got caught up-to-no-good in Uganda, and have been invited into Liberia. Which is even more disturbing, if you think about it - the fact that there...
  • Commented on The iron law of development
    Bloody hell, a google brings up this from a day ago: https://www.ei-ie.org/en/news/news_details/4073 Uganda's government has ordered that country's Bridge schools closed. . . and if this point is true, they sound like nice people: "n June, global condemnation of Bridge...
  • Commented on The iron law of development
    Thanks very much for this. I'm not at all surprised by this. Non-localisation was an issue I came across in Sierra Leone with regard to an Indian religious order who do a lot of F2F work in Africa. By the...
  • Commented on The iron law of development
    Scheisse, that penultimate sentence should read: "It might have some value as a stopgap for a country in the sort of situation Liberia is in (I mean with regard to education, etc.), but I don't think it's viable over the...
  • Commented on The iron law of development
    Re: the Electronic Classroom. I once, long long ago, produced some content for an online course run by a UK university. . . but most of my teaching experience is in the face-to-face meatspace context. And I have to say...
  • Commented on Who wins? Cthulhu or the Emperor of Mankind from Warhammer 40K?
    Here's a French take (in English translation) on the same idea of the fantasy world meeting ours: http://english.bouletcorp.com/2009/04/24/war-of-the-worlds/...
  • Commented on The iron law of development
    "The Irish had potatoes." And that worked out well, didn't it?...
  • Commented on The iron law of development
    If you're interested in understanding the true limits, and the true relevance of that bit of American foundational mythology, you might want to look at Igor Kopytoff's The African Frontier. Kopytoff was a stateless person until he finally got American...
  • Commented on What are you reading this summer?
    I'm going to reread Evans-Pritchard's The Nuer, in particular the chapter about time and ecology, or 'oecology' to use EP's spelling. Possibly also Rapaport's Pigs for the Ancestors. Maybe also Zola's The Debacle. We'll see what happens....
  • Commented on A plaintive request
    Greg: Social change in the Republic of Ireland has been very rapid, and, as Charlie noted, there are now pluralities of voters in that state who are now (if the polls can be believed) in favour of repealing the eighth...
  • Commented on A plaintive request
    A regular tactic used by the Nacht Hexen/Night Witches of the Red Air Force against the Luftwaffe, during the 1939 - 1945 unpleasantness....
  • Commented on A plaintive request
    With regard to renewable energy. . . sometime around 1980 RTE (Irish state broadcaster) used to screen a series they'd bought following a radical journalist who was preparing a report on renewable and alternative energy sources (wave power was a...
  • Commented on Constitutional crisis ahoy!
    By 1972, the Officials had called a unilateral ceasefire, which they largely stuck to from then on. That was also when they underwent their own peculiar political metamorphosis, from fierce criticism of the Provisionals to being Marxists (Moscow variety) to...
  • Commented on Constitutional crisis ahoy!
    "At least it's not like in the early 1970s, when the IRA had more weapons and people trained in their use than the Eire government did, and said publicly that Dublin was their next target after throwing the Brits out."...
  • Commented on The unavoidable discussion
    No. Just no. Whatever happens, there is no way the north of Ireland will seek independent statehood. It is not viable as an independent state, for a start, with most of its industrial base gone the way of all British...
  • Commented on The unavoidable discussion
    The Good Friday Agreement stipulates that the end of partition can only be ended with the consent of both populations in Ireland. That agreement is supported by all but the marginal and irrelevant in Dublin, Belfast and London. So the...
  • Commented on The unavoidable discussion
    Speaking of the new members in the East. . . they have their own Europhobics, don't do they? What UKxit mean for them?...
  • Commented on The unavoidable discussion
    The biggest trading partner, sure, but no longer the destination of two-thirds of Irish exports. A brexit - which ain't gonna happen, but let's say it did - would mean that the pressure cooker would have to be dealt with,...
  • Commented on The unavoidable discussion
    I'll be very surprised if Brexit passes, by the way. What do the rest of you think?...
  • Commented on The unavoidable discussion
    Given that even troops sent to Congo or similar places for 'peace-keeping' missions have been caught engaging in disgraceful behaviour - torture, sexual exploitation of minors etc. (and yes, this includes western troops) - I'm afraid I can't share your...
  • Commented on The unavoidable discussion
    The EU as a vaccine against war in Europe? Great, sign me up? But what if it only means that instead of being sent to die in Flanders, you're sent to die in Central Asia or the Congo? Now regarding...
  • Commented on Some notes on world building
    And the repeal of the Corn Laws in 1846 was followed, the next year in Ireland, by. . . Wait for it. . . You'll like this one. . . BLACK '47, the very worst year of the famine. Which,...
  • Commented on Some notes on world building
    Relevant story: in the late 70s the USSR brought off a coup where they used Wall Street-based front companies to buy up a big chunk of the US wheat harvest, and ship it off to the workers' motherland. There's a...
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