Simon Farnsworth

Simon Farnsworth

  • Commented on The impotence of the long-distance trillionaire
    And on that count, I've noted that even when a white 18 year old man goes explicitly to a black majority area to shoot up black people, and leaves behind notes saying that they're doing that because they believe that...
  • Commented on The impotence of the long-distance trillionaire
    To emphasise your gun culture point; I've been in a big name store in the USA (not a specialist gun retailer, just a store that sells guns among other things) and had a staff member try to sell me a...
  • Commented on The impotence of the long-distance trillionaire
    The difficulty AIUI is that SCOTUS has previously ruled that the "well-regulated militia" is a state-level function, not a federal function, and so while Congress could legislate to say that you have to be in your state's "well-regulated militia", Texas...
  • Commented on The impotence of the long-distance trillionaire
    On the topic of a wealth tax: First, any wealth tax that's workable needs to account for earnings over your lifetime so far - because Greg Tingey is over 60, you expect him to have accumulated more wealth than someone...
  • Commented on The impotence of the long-distance trillionaire
    It's the fact that they're winning votes instead of being arrested and convicted before they stand for Parliament that's depressing. I'd much prefer it if the nasty party ran out of candidates because they're all locked away for our safety....
  • Commented on The impotence of the long-distance trillionaire
    I am not nearly cynical enough to believe that there are multiple MPs who would deliberately ensure that they matched the description of the alleged offender simply so that attempts to research the identity of the latest alleged offender are...
  • Commented on The impotence of the long-distance trillionaire
    This is one of the deeper issues underlying anti-globalization sentiment: where previously, money tended to circulate locally, now it crosses administrative borders, and thus where previously local politics could put restraints on the worst tendencies of your local Dragon-type human,...
  • Commented on The impotence of the long-distance trillionaire
    That's not my experience of 1930s builds; the low end of the market indeed didn't have servants' quarters, but the ones I've seen where the initial selling price (in the 1930s) was more than about £250 did have (small, only...
  • Commented on The impotence of the long-distance trillionaire
    World War 1 started the decline in live-in servants for the middle classes, World War 2 killed the profession off completely. My great-grandfather was a British Indian Army officer; income-wise, that put him in a comparable situation to a reasonably...
  • Commented on The impotence of the long-distance trillionaire
    Absolutely - that's why I put it in terms of what full-time work can reasonably get you over a lifetime. In 1860, a London living wage was around £40/year, and with 50 working years, that only gets you to £2,000....
  • Commented on The impotence of the long-distance trillionaire
    It appears, from what I can find, that it's random for most people, but that if you have a specific disability (hearing impairment, for example) and can justify that you would not use a sat nav as a result of...
  • Commented on The impotence of the long-distance trillionaire
    Single digit millionaires do make sense. A "standard" 9-5 Mon-Fri job in the West works out to around 2,000 hours per year, and most people have a working life of approximately 50 years, give or take (some work more, some...
  • Commented on The impotence of the long-distance trillionaire
    That was implied by "resolved in English" - we have always stolen words from other languages in preference to inventing our own :-)...
  • Commented on The impotence of the long-distance trillionaire
    It has the same ambiguity as "left" and "right" onboard a ship - is it "left" and "right" when facing upstream or downstream? For ships, we resolved that in English with larboard (later port) and starboard, which are not the...
  • Commented on The impotence of the long-distance trillionaire
    Amazon do pay some British taxes, despite the Luxembourg stunt. The Luxembourg stunt lets Amazon avoid British Corporation Tax (and, IMO, is a loophole that should be closed) - because the profit is generated in Luxembourg, at least on paper,...
  • Commented on The impotence of the long-distance trillionaire
    I would agree that this type needs splitting by motivations. It's just that the economics papers I've read don't do that, by and large - they only seem to split by outcome in terms of change in wealth. Some do...
  • Commented on The impotence of the long-distance trillionaire
    The research shows that separating out components of a price tag like this is a good way to get people to oppose the components of price tag that they don't perceive as valuable. In this instance (sales taxes), it helps...
  • Commented on The impotence of the long-distance trillionaire
    I don't like your name for type 3 (the build it up, drop back to "comfortable multi-millionaire", build it up again people). Elon Musk is a commonly used example of this archetype for billionaires: if you look at his history,...
  • Commented on The impotence of the long-distance trillionaire
    They're not my ideas - I'm just summarising what I see in various branches of economics research. And the three archetypes keeping reappearing, it's just that no-one's named them formally in the literature yet - mostly because the researchers tend...
  • Commented on The impotence of the long-distance trillionaire
    For what little it's worth, I keep an eye on what the economists who study the "value of money" have to say about it - current thinking is that one problem with money is that the value of money is...
  • Commented on Bad news day
    I find it amusing that you parrot Sunak's lines about why we need to reduce our gross profit margins almost word-for-word, talking in exactly the terms he uses to justify austerity, and then turn around and suggest that for pointing...
  • Commented on Bad news day
    I have read what you said - and implicit in it is the idea that you have a choice about what net profit margin you're willing to accept. In practice, you don't - the market price for your good or...
  • Commented on Bad news day
    No; if your current gross profit margin (GPM) is 15%, and your costs increase by 10% (but your competitors don't), you will see your GPM fall to 10% at most over time, or you will go out of business as...
  • Commented on Bad news day
    The point is that it's not a convention, it's an emergent behaviour of markets - if you cut your prices without increasing the volume you sell sufficiently, you make less money compared to a competitor who doesn't cut their prices...
  • Commented on Bad news day
    You don't set the profit margin - it's not something a business has a say in directly, it's something determined by the difference between prices and costs. This is basic economics from the 18th century, and not new - it's...
  • Commented on Bad news day
    So, I took the Opex page from that report for 2019, and turned it to %ages for all the bits that are directly related to flight operations, ignoring selling costs, currency costs, and property/IT 28.5% of IAG's opex is fuel....
  • Commented on Bad news day
    I used to live in a flat less than a minute's walk (including the stairs) from a secondary school, with a bus stop just outside. In my time in that flat, I saw two children injured to the point of...
  • Commented on Quantum of Nightmares: spoiler time!
    Satellite operations are a skill in their own right, and not really usable for emcomms without serious practice. For starters, with the exception of QO-100, a satellite pass is short (at least in the UK) - you've got maybe 15...
  • Commented on Quantum of Nightmares: spoiler time!
    In the UK, we're only permitted to use things like phone patches when passing messages under clauses 1(2) and 1(3), or if we have suitable Notices of Variation applied to our licences. Clause 10(3) of our licence terms explicitly forbids...
  • Commented on Oh, 2022!
    I knew I'd missed some gallons when I said three - I could only remember those three off the top of my head because they're the three that became British Imperial and US customary measures. IIRC (and it's a while...
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