Charles H

Charles H

  • Commented on No comment necessary
    The thing is, one way in which the human mind is not equivalent to a Turing Machine is that it's inconsistent. This implies that the rules of formal logic will not be of use, though it doesn't say what to...
  • Commented on No comment necessary
    Well, I don't think Biden is quite that bad, but I'm sure not enthused by him...quite the opposite, in fact. But I *might* become enthused by his VP choice. Perhaps. OTOH, I've got to admit that the candidates that I...
  • Commented on No comment necessary
    Well, if the elections have been postponed, then the House *can't* meet. Doesn't do any good to say they must if there are no current members. Of course, that also means that there is no legal possibility of passing any...
  • Commented on No comment necessary
    Thanks. I wasn't aware the warfarin was multiple active compounds, I though Coumadin was just more purified. (So as to meet USP standards.)...
  • Commented on No comment necessary
    My take on it is that ALL the Democrat VP candidates are better than either Trump or Pence. Which one will do the most to ensure that Trump loses? (I don't know.) It *is* a very important question, as the...
  • Commented on No comment necessary
    I can't argue with your worst case scenario, but it looks unlikely. Most likely seems that antibody based immunity is transient, but TCell based immunity is durable. This MAY mean that second cases become "silent spreaders", but would also mean...
  • Commented on No comment necessary
    Coumadin *is* warfarin. I think they changed the name so that people wouldn't realize that they were being prescribed rat poison, but it's exactly the same drug. More highly refined, usually, but otherwise the same. Dosage is critical....
  • Commented on No comment necessary
    The advantage of warfarin as a rat poison are that rats don't notice that they've been poisoned. They die of blood loss, and considerably later. Also it's extremely bitter, so people and many other animals aren't tempted to eat it....
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    A brief counter: The study did not assert permanent heart damage. Of course, it also didn't deny it. It was a brief study, and IIRC only covered about a couple of months after symptoms. So... It *could* be very bad...
  • Commented on "It'll all be over by Christmas" (Part 2)
    re: Cities in Flight, Jim Blish. I only read a couple of those, but the ones that I read aren't quite what I had in mind. About the right size is all. My idea is closer to George Zebroski's MacroLife,...
  • Commented on "It'll all be over by Christmas" (Part 2)
    The problem is that when you step back, you are introducing a new axiom. There are (at least) two valid axioms that you could introduce, one of which would enable you to conclude that he is a knight, and the...
  • Commented on "It'll all be over by Christmas" (Part 2)
    You're using "Libertarian" to tar "libertarian". They are quite distinct. A libertarian is quite close to a minarchist, but more willing to grant a role to government. Thus "Libertarian" is a proper subset of "libertarian". But it's a small subset....
  • Commented on "It'll all be over by Christmas" (Part 2)
    Well, in this case the answer to the Fermi paradox is "They aren't interested in planets". Possibly modify that by "anymore"....
  • Commented on "It'll all be over by Christmas" (Part 2)
    Well, actually there are lots of things required for a isolated Space Habitat. Fission power might work, but fusion is a lot easier to refuel. Other things, in no particular order: 1) A nearly closed ecology 2) Predictive sociology that...
  • Commented on "It'll all be over by Christmas" (Part 2)
    Think of "libertarian" as a range over a multidimensional map. Some kinds of libertarianism are insane in a space environment, and others are reasonable. E.g. a Space Habitat would need strict limits on reproduction, but could be quite libertarian WRT...
  • Commented on "It'll all be over by Christmas" (Part 2)
    So maybe considerably less than I said. I'm not committed to any particular speed, except that it's got to be slow enough that local drift isn't dangerous, and fast enough that you keep encountering new resources. It's the rocks and...
  • Commented on "It'll all be over by Christmas" (Part 2)
    Solution? I don't have a solution. I understand that GitHub needed support, but being owned by Microsoft means that I don't trust them as much. I'm still considering alternatives, and I haven't moved the stuff I put on GitHub off...
  • Commented on "It'll all be over by Christmas" (Part 2)
    Well, as I remember....Not exactly pointers. There were based variables, where the variable was relative to the base. IIRC that wasn't exactly a pointer, but more of a frame offset to the program. Close, but relative to where the program...
  • Commented on "It'll all be over by Christmas" (Part 2)
    If you read the post, that's what I said. But it seems necessary to say that because of so many "homesteading on the new frontier" memes floating about. To some extent I blame Heinlein....
  • Commented on "It'll all be over by Christmas" (Part 2)
    Two wheel drive is not part of the definition of station wagon. The original station wagons were pulled by a horse. What is the definition is that is can haul enough freight to handle a family going on a trip....
  • Commented on "It'll all be over by Christmas" (Part 2)
    FWIW, I would often dearly love to use C if it could handle unicode decently, handled threading decently (here I'm talking about independent processes that need to communicate with each other, what Python calls multiprocessing), and a few other things....
  • Commented on "It'll all be over by Christmas" (Part 2)
    All of which are (part of) why I prefer the idea of SLOW space habitats that drift along at around .01c or less WRT the average local drift. They need to drift fast enough to continually encounter new resources, and...
  • Commented on "It'll all be over by Christmas" (Part 2)
    Yes, different. Their approach is different. I see, however, no reason to believe that they are any more trustworthy. Certainly they have done their best to continue the sabotage of open standards. Running a Linux distribution as a process of...
  • Commented on "It'll all be over by Christmas" (Part 2)
    Well, my wife's standard requirement for a car was "It has to be able to haul a harpsichord." The Toyota 1990 Corolla station wagon could do that, but I haven't checked out any more modern car....
  • Commented on "It'll all be over by Christmas" (Part 2)
    IIRC, PL/1 had two or three ways to pass by reference. Some were pointers, some were offsets into structures, etc. PL/1 was a nice language in many ways that didn't deserve the abuse many heaped upon it. But it *did*...
  • Commented on "It'll all be over by Christmas" (Part 2)
    re: So it should be possible human brains are capable of things computers can't do That doesn't follow. It *MAY* be correct, but probably only in the limit. What *IS* correct is that the brain can do many things a...
  • Commented on "It'll all be over by Christmas" (Part 2)
    re: And so on. Emulating this analog network of networks digitally gets.... kind of tricky. Possibly to impossible levels of tricky. OTOH, "How close is 'good enough'?". Analog signals aren't processed with infinite precision. It's just difficult to say how...
  • Commented on "It'll all be over by Christmas" (Part 2)
    re: The other line of argument is that we don't have an intelligible explanation of how consciousness or qualia can be supervenient on physical brains and therefore they cannot be implemented on artificial ones. That argument is just wrong. There...
  • Commented on "It'll all be over by Christmas" (Part 2)
    That would be a very interesting refutation of Einstein's Relativity. "Flat space" would not seem to exist in the same universe as material objects, however. But if it did, centrifugal force should mimic the effects of gravity. That's one of...
  • Commented on "It'll all be over by Christmas" (Part 2)
    Actually, Turing Machines can't exist in this reality. Turing Machines require an infinitely long tape and no errors in processing. Well, they make great theoretical pieces, because they're easy to analyze. But Actual Turing Machines (ATMs?) utilize error correction that...
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