guthrie

guthrie

  • Commented on The Curse of Laundry
    And there's this: http://coppolacomment.blogspot.co.uk/2013/02/bifurcation-in-labour-market.html "But job insecurity and robots are only half the problem. The other half is skills. Businesses are constantly moaning that they can't get the skills they need, and blaming the education system for failing to provide...
  • Commented on The Curse of Laundry
    ON what's happening re. jobs and the recovery (hint - normal people are stuck in the mud), this blog has a nice round up: http://flipchartfairytales.wordpress.com/2014/10/22/lost-decade-we-used-to-dream-of-a-lost-decade/ What confuses me is that there's allegedly going to be an increase in demand for...
  • Commented on The Curse of Laundry
    When we talk about the upper class nowadays, although I often use the term "Owning class", we/ I mean the ones who actually have the money, power and influence. Sure, (in a hypothetical example) your grandfather might have been a...
  • Commented on The Curse of Laundry
    Greg - it's easy to have a better recovery than other countries when 1) you've had the worst recession for a century or two, so the economy behaves somewhat like the north of Britain after the melting of the glaciers,...
  • Commented on The Curse of Laundry
    It's difficult, but the thing is to imagine the conservatives aren't evil lizards and instead a bunch of normal humans, and since they are top politicians, driven by ego, vanity, and a number of other desires. So the thing is,...
  • Commented on The Curse of Laundry
    I've seen that claim that ukip are taking old labour voters, and yet not seen much evidence for it. Rather they are taking tory voters, disaffected daily mail readers and others of their ilk. Sure, there has always been an...
  • Commented on Not a Manifesto
    I foresse a health epidemic in Bangkok, of whatevr variety consuming heavy metals, a cocktail of drugs and other things on your food. If it affects only the rich, that is a start. In 19th century Britain, the owning class...
  • Commented on Not a Manifesto
    I don't think you've broken down the survival resources in the late 19th century versus the early 21st as well as would be useful. For instance: Food 19th C - some fertiliser from guano etc, and it's amazing what a...
  • Commented on Metacommentary
    Certainly wikipedia indicates that Epping forest is hardly under democratic control/ management. As for Charles I, Cromwell and James II, I look forwards to your bestselling book linking the powers behind the scenes then with the powers behind the scene...
  • Commented on Metacommentary
    Greg, greg, greg, just because you disagree with someone doesn't mean that a) they are wrong, b) they are stalinists, c) they are not 'green' or 'conservative' or suchlike. Your alleged fact filled post contained nothing which would make me...
  • Commented on Metacommentary
    Don't be silly, Greg doesn't need evidence to rant about political opponents!...
  • Commented on Not a Manifesto
    On the other hand I wouldn't expect to lose all modern infrastructure etc. So I don't think 9 billion would die off, rather millions here and there. Of course it depends how bad things get, some people have suggested all...
  • Commented on Metacommentary
    Last time I knew, scientism was actually along the lines of "Hey, science can explain this even although it can't", or rather running to science for every possible explanation. It certainly wasn't having some faith in the idea that science...
  • Commented on Metacommentary
    Actually I can't think of any examples of that. Most that I am aware of were deliberately inflicted....
  • Commented on Not a Manifesto
    Of course if we want to sustain human numbers on earth without culling/ murders/ sterilisation, we're going to need technology, but at this stage being overoptimistic about the possibilities is unhelpful....
  • Commented on Not a Manifesto
    Nope, that's rather a misrepresentation of technological progress. Pulling things out of asses is for novels, not for actual real world technology. Moreover there are many societies in history which died or withered due to changes in their circumstances; predicting...
  • Commented on Not a Manifesto
    Yes you were a little unfair to cloaks, but only a little. As a medieval and tudor re-enactor, I a intimately familiar with them, I've got 3 of them*, as well as normal clothing. They are great for plodding in...
  • Commented on Not a Manifesto
    Perhaps you're simplifying for the audience, but turbine blades haven't been made of steel at any time that I am aware of. FOr instance nickel superalloys are used, single crystal, with active cooling, and also some funky grains of carbides...
  • Commented on Not a Manifesto
    Just to add to the fun, theres the common public perception of magic and the actual history of magic, and as such magic turns out to be more a matter of technology, i.e. using the right substance at the right...
  • Commented on Not a Manifesto
    *Puts on sackcloth and ashes* (Are you worried that I actually do have some of both lying around?) More seriously, I noticed this a few years ago now with Justina Robson, who after writing some decent SF has veered off...
  • Commented on A brief, bitter quiz
    FIrstly, the HUrricane was more useful and important at the start of the war; secondly the Spitfire wasn't just luck, there was a great deal of planning and began with a specification number F.5/34 in the early to mid 30's,...
  • Commented on Parallel Reconstruction and the new Stasi
    Happily, the government has privatised forensic services in the UK and thus destroyed any possible attempts to actually improve them....
  • Commented on Parallel Reconstruction and the new Stasi
    The problem being that it isn't so far until we are like that; indeed it appears that you could run the NSA exactly like the STasi and nobody would notice, after all who listens to agitators and protestors complaining about...
  • Commented on A brief, bitter quiz
    Eventually I worked out that the weapons system is the most important bit, not the specific actors involved. And Greg, yes, I know we are an island, and we had a re-armament program in 1937, although I don't recall Chamberlain's...
  • Commented on A brief, bitter quiz
    Rather, my reply was based on the fact that earlier people were talking about first world threats then you reply to me by moaning about cheaper more terroristic threats. I think it clear there might be some developed country on...
  • Commented on A brief, bitter quiz
    So what you're saying is that our large slow warships are very vulnerable to cheap foreign missiles if we decide to have a military adventure somewhere, and nobody is going to be attacking us with submarines? Then why do we...
  • Commented on A brief, bitter quiz
    So who exactly are we going to fight who has any appreciable capability? The USA? France? China? Russia? That's the question, isn't it? The first two are very unlikely, the next really about as likely, given the economic conditions. That...
  • Commented on The morning after
    That would be the TSA and estate agents against an unholy alliance of drug traffickers, package holiday organisers and event organisers. I've no idea who would win but it would be entertaining....
  • Commented on The morning after
    Charlie has touched upon one of the reasons I am extremely wary of regionalisation- the differential costs of living in different parts of the country. Higher service costs in the countryside, although obviously in London you have higher housing costs....
  • Commented on The morning after
    The other problem with regionalising the UK and letting it all have different tax and spend powers, is that different parts of the UK do genuinely have different problems and access to capital, human and other, and it ignores the...
Subscribe to feed Recent Actions from guthrie

Following

Not following anyone

Specials

Merchandise

About This Page

Find recent content on the main index or look in the archives to find all content.

Search this blog

Propaganda