guthrie

guthrie

  • Commented on Sad Trombone Exoplanet Reality Check
    Sure dude, whatever....
  • Commented on Sad Trombone Exoplanet Reality Check
    Drug development is easily as time consuming and complex as programming, and probably with as many undesired and unforeseen outcomes. Except they are more serious. The first article you linked to didn't define what "best" is in the drug research...
  • Commented on Sad Trombone Exoplanet Reality Check
    Hey, looks like I was wrong re. vitamin D defiency, but then so was elderly Cynic. If you believe the figures the government gives from a survey, it's more like 25% at risk of deficiency: https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/213703/dh_132508.pdf Of course the further...
  • Commented on Sad Trombone Exoplanet Reality Check
    Indeed, but absent actual figures, I'll just say that at risk from is not the same as suffering from, therefore you overstated yourself. As for retirement and activity, the retired for several years father of a friend of mine, seems...
  • Commented on Sad Trombone Exoplanet Reality Check
    Whoa, that's rather a big claim re. rickets. Are you sure you aren't recalling your own childhood a century ago or more? A search of the internet using google scholar finds things like this: http://adc.bmj.com/content/89/8/699.full.pdf which found that between 20...
  • Commented on The iron law of development
    Yup, it seems to have been as easy as that. Sulphurbwas known about for millennia, and used and traded easily enough. Saltpetre was just another white crystalline solid, of which there were many sorts, and it looks rather like (from...
  • Commented on The iron law of development
    Salt petre was mentioned above, the interesting thing in European history how farming for it was discovered/ spread, and kept secret a lot, such that even by the 16th century there were people trying to sell it and others trying...
  • Commented on The iron law of development
    At this point someone usually mentions the Open University, except that it's approach and clientele are not the same as proposed by the education cheapeners. There is an argument for making education more open and say OU like, and encouraging...
  • Commented on The iron law of development
    The problem with online courses and moocs etc right now is that they are simply being treated as another capitalist profit centre, a new one, so there are lots of boosters, spivs and get rich quick merchants out there exploiting...
  • Commented on The iron law of development
    I recall a forum years ago where someone cropped up who seemed to genuinely be (Genuine as in argued at obsessive length, not just a troll who tried to irritate) pro-birth and argued for people to have as many children...
  • Commented on The iron law of development
    Well that is hard to say, isn't it? I've heard a few bad things about Italian archaeology, the patronage system is endemic and bad, but not heard much about Spanish archaeology. For what it says, my supervisor at UCL was...
  • Commented on The iron law of development
    Yup, I was just adding some of my own knowledge. I do have an MSc in Technology and Analysis of Archaeological materials, even if I haven't been able to put it to professional use, because there aren't many jobs or...
  • Commented on The iron law of development
    Certainly 5 or 6 years ago, the presiding theory about the start of the copper age is that people noticed that some stones they built their pottery kiln from, or added to it for some reason, produced red metal that...
  • Commented on The iron law of development
    The interesting and tricky bit is that you can do isotopic analysis on metal to work out where it came from, but only as long as it has hardly been used and recycled since it was mined. Otherwise all the...
  • Commented on The iron law of development
    But as your link says, it's actually quite hard, especially if you are in pre-industrial times, which is the relevant point here. Which is why brass was discovered a lot later than bronze, and took a long time to get...
  • Commented on The iron law of development
    But we're discussing the abilities of pressure and early industrial societies to discover, mine, smelt and use metals, so zinc might be common in the crust but how common were it's ore bodies? Not that much as far as I...
  • Commented on The iron law of development
    Yes, that sounds like part of archaeology. There's a lot of hogging stuff to yourself, and howing your own row and not caring about other people's. I think I've even seen it in the same building, which isn't sensible at...
  • Commented on The iron law of development
    Not sure they are open or anything, it is all reported in the CBA Research report 139, "Excavations at Deansway, WOrcester 1988-89, Romano-British small town to late medieval city". By Dalwood and Edwards. As usual, the report only came out...
  • Commented on The iron law of development
    Ahhh, but then how do you get to the Aluminium? Actually maybe someone would make a working engine that used bronze, and after a while, maybe a generation or two of tinkering, someone would think of Al and cooling, but...
  • Commented on The iron law of development
    No, really really bronze can't substitute for iron for armour. Iron is just too damn strong for its weight, malleable, etc. And of course easily available. In the switch from bronze to iron age, a lot of archaeologists like to...
  • Commented on The iron law of development
    I never said it was, I was merely entertaining the other poster's idea, although I had forgotten about Peterhead....
  • Commented on The iron law of development
    What's your problem with archaeologists and tin supplies? We don't know all sources by any means, but there's evidence for a number of sources. Are you sure you have been reading more up to date stuff, like from the last...
  • Commented on The iron law of development
    Typing as part archaeometallurgist, regarding the reverberatory furnaces and iron, it's not a bad suggestion, but needs more evidence and refinement. I note though that Worcester had several large reverberatory furnaces in the late medieval/ early modern period for casting...
  • Commented on The iron law of development
    Also thanks for summarising it. The first thing that comes to mind is that your bridges etc stay more like roman and medieval ones, until you find a substitute for iron in re-inforced concrete. The internet does suggest that that...
  • Commented on The iron law of development
    Bronze would be a good start, but the issues are with sources of Tin. And so with brass, which also requires a comparatively rare alloying addition, with added fun of losing most of said alloying if you don't do it...
  • Commented on The iron law of development
    Oh good, arsenical bronze is making itself more widely known outside archaeological circles. Anyway, can someone summarise what you are all arguing about? As for Scottish CO2 emissions, the internet is messy, so all I could find was this: http://www.gov.scot/Publications/2008/11/19142102/5...
  • Commented on The iron law of development
    Steel is not necessarily better than cast iron or such in all circumstances and uses, not to mention cost....
  • Commented on The iron law of development
    Nope, my point about the Romans is right. The Romans were quite good at some things but pants at many others, by the standard of the high and late medieval periods. See also the spread of windmills across Europe, and...
  • Commented on The iron law of development
    Yes, I know stainless is good, I am part materials scientist. Of course it depends what you want to do with the stainless. And iron, well, if it's nearly pure it can last a surprisingly long time, see that pillar...
  • Commented on The iron law of development
    "Natural life span"? What do you mean, the Tay bridge disaster was nothing to do with how long the bridge had been in use. The Romans also likely never developed concrete further because 1) they didn't have the marriage of...
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