Jocelyn Ireson-Paine

Jocelyn Ireson-Paine

  • Commented on Solarpunk rising, or how to turn boring bureaucratic meetings into creative fodder
    See https://johncarlosbaez.wordpress.com/2014/02/07/network-theory-talks-at-oxford/ and http://math.ucr.edu/home/baez/networks/ . And, for motivation, http://math.ucr.edu/home/baez/networks/networks_1.html on "Green Mathematics". Said theoretical physicist is, however, far from unemployed....
  • Commented on Why I barely read SF these days
    This conversation reminds me of a John Campbell editorial I once read about the Dean Drive, a purported reactionless drive. I've just found a web copy of the editorial, from Analog 64(4): 83-106 (June 1960). It's interesting as a...
  • Commented on Why I barely read SF these days
    The library, I should have added, is free. More universities should emulate Oxford Brookes....
  • Commented on Why I barely read SF these days
    I have two local universities: one dating from probably before 1100, and one which became a university in 1992. The former first makes outsiders complete a Statement of Research Need for access to its main library, then makes them pay....
  • Commented on Why I barely read SF these days
    I suspect — or hope — you mean exponential....
  • Commented on Why I barely read SF these days
    Oh, forbid emoji completely. We were taught that it wasn't even necessary to use italics or exclamation marks when writing, since skilled use of words can make any meaning clear without. But if you are going to allow emoji, why...
  • Commented on Why I barely read SF these days
    Concerning fondleslabs, weirdness, and OGH's original post: XKCD has a cartoon about how the world became weird for the Unicode people....
  • Commented on Dude, you broke the future!
    That's a nice paper. I think it's improved my understanding of emergence too. Equations (5) and (6) are the key ones, it seems. Now I need to understand decoherence well enough to see what (2) and (3) are telling me....
  • Commented on Dude, you broke the future!
    But it is possible to interfere two different particles. The best example is the famous Hong-Ou-Mandel interferometer. Even then, you have to do a lot of work to synchronize the sources of the particles. Thanks. So that clears one thing...
  • Commented on Dude, you broke the future!
    And this interference is very different from an interaction. Interaction is about some charged or massive particle exerting force on another. Interference is about particles getting into exactly the same quantum state except for the phase, which then makes make...
  • Commented on Dude, you broke the future!
    ALMOST the Pope:...
  • Commented on Dude, you broke the future!
    Going back to the discussion of social media and addiction, here's a little comic strip. Click on the image..In case it's not visible above, THIS drawing might indicate which particular social media I was referring to....
  • Commented on Dude, you broke the future!
    I do a lot of my work from coffee shops. Many people have trouble believing that I can possibly be working if I'm not at the office! — and no it's not a convenient time to talk right now....
  • Commented on Dude, you broke the future!
    In case it's not clear, I'm asking whether there's some way we can give people a kind of mental immune system that would protect them against addictive software and media, including the attention-maximising AI-generated videos. Perhaps one thing we can...
  • Commented on Dude, you broke the future!
    Coincidentally, I drew this a few days ago while watching tourists in a local café. I also drew this: Most of the customers are obsessed with their phones, so one ends up drawing a lot of phones and hands. This...
  • Commented on Burn The Programmer!
    You're talking about things that are a lot more than 20 years old. But what's with cut and paste - are libraries too hard to use now? It's a coincidence that I just finished a blog post showing why libraries...
  • Commented on Excuses
    "My esteemed and wise colleague, David Shariatmadari, contrasted the anarchic world of bikes with the “rigorously tested and policed” arena of driving." There’s a flaw with this argument: there’s no evidence it’s true. Funny. Yesterday, a cyclist rode past me...
  • Commented on A bright and shiny hell
    One of the problems especially in the Helsinki region is that most people speak passable English and switch to that whenever they hear somebody speak Finnish that is not perfect. When I was working in Athens, a lot of Greeks...
  • Commented on A bright and shiny hell
    Was there some reason why $ apt install r-recommended didn't work, or did you feel like making things more difficult on Linux just because ? :) I was following the instructions at https://cran.r-project.org/bin/linux/ubuntu/README.html , which being on the R site,...
  • Commented on A bright and shiny hell
    Of course being spectacularly bad and insecure doesn't seem to matter to corporate buyers as much as familiarity. See also "Microsoft Windows" Don't knock Windows. I had to install R (the statistical language) together with some extra packages on Ubuntu....
  • Commented on A bright and shiny hell
    One of the many reasons I get miffed if people put my name in quotes, like I'm trying to hide behind it. I'd put it in quotes, and perhaps even rephrase as "user 'gasdive'" or similar. Not to imply a...
  • Commented on A bright and shiny hell
    In the meantime I missed out on a significant number of invites and got quite a few in-person "why didn't you go to X" type comments from people concerned that I was annoyed or unwell. No offence, but if the...
  • Commented on Paging Agent 007
    Considering that most people seem to think that "Boy meets Girl, boy loses girl, troubles ensue, boy gets girl back" is still a rich vein of literary gold, I think we could guess that "party on hyperboloid world has issues"...
  • Commented on Paging Agent 007
    By the way, and returning to the theme of this thread, I suspect Dichronauts follows the Great Man or Heroic Physicist theory of history....
  • Commented on Paging Agent 007
    Me too. I'm still waiting for Blackwell's Oxford to get a copy — they'd rather stuff their shelves with Eddings, Eddison and Feist — but at least I can give thanks for living in a universe with a sane space-time...
  • Commented on Paging Agent 007
    TIME:YOU'RE NOT GOOD AT IT Some of us are very very good at time. Greg Egan, for example. He's just published an entire book in which people have twice as many times as usual....
  • Commented on The light at the end of the tunnel (is not necessarily an oncoming train)
    The Culture would not have ship types. Types are for inferior civilisations which have to pre-assign products into classes (S, M, L, 32" S, 32" R, 32" L, bootcut, skinny, flare) because manufacturing isn't sufficiently advanced to fabricate just-in-time on-the-spot...
  • Commented on I can't keep up
    I've not used Axiom. Do you mean the computer-algebra system?. What I have used, however, and what I don't think anyone here has yet mentioned, is algebraic-specification languages, particularly the OBJ family. In these languages, programs are specifications written as...
  • Commented on The internet of decay
    Oops. Link should have been this: "Associative Programming and Snobol's Unusual Indirect-Referencing Operator"....
  • Commented on The internet of decay
    Associative arrays? The only proper way to do them is Snobol. You've got associative tables: animal_sounds< "cat" > = "miaouw" animal_sounds< "dog" > = "woof" But you can also do string indirection through variables: cat = "miaouw" animal = "cat"...
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